7328461242 Info

  • Phone Number7328461242
  • CompanyVerizon New Jersey
  • StateNew Jersey
  • CityNew Brunswick, NJ
  • CountyMiddlesex
  • Prefix846
  • Area Code732
  • UsageLandline

7328461242 USA Telephone Phone State > New Jersey 732-846-1242, New Brunswick, NJ, Middlesex

New Brunswick, NJ

New Brunswick (French: Nouveau-Brunswick; pronounced: [nu.vo.bʁœn.swik], Quebec French pronunciation: [nu.vo.bʁɔn.zwɪk] ( )) is one of Canada's three Maritime provinces and is the only province in the Canadian federation that is constitutionally bilingual (English–French). It was created as a result of the partitioning of the British Colony of Nova Scotia in 1784. Fredericton is the capital and Saint John is the most populous city. In the 2011 nationwide census, Statistics Canada estimated the provincial population to have been 751,171. The majority of the population is English-speaking, but there is also a large Francophone minority (33%), chiefly of Acadian origin.

Etymology

The province is named for the city of Braunschweig, formerly known in English as Brunswick, located in modern day Lower Saxony in northern Germany (and also the former duchy of the same name). Braunschweig is the ancestral home of the Hanoverian King George III of the United Kingdom.

Geography

New Brunswick is bounded on the north by Quebec's Gaspé Peninsula and by Chaleur Bay. The eastern boundary is formed by the Gulf of Saint Lawrence and Northumberland Strait. The southeast corner of the province is connected to the Nova Scotia peninsula by the narrow Isthmus of Chignecto. The south of the province is bounded by the Bay of Fundy coast, (which with a rise of 16 m (52 ft), has amongst the highest tides in the world). The US state of Maine forms the western boundary.

New Brunswick differs from the other Maritime provinces physiographically, climatologically, and ethnoculturally. Both Nova Scotia and Prince Edward Island are either surrounded by, or are almost completely surrounded by water. Oceanic effects therefore tend to define their climate, economy, and culture. On the other hand, New Brunswick, although having a significant seacoast, is sheltered from the Atlantic Ocean proper and has a large interior that is removed from oceanic influences. As a result, the climate tends to be more continental in character rather than maritime.

The major river systems of the province include the St. Croix River, Saint John River, Kennebecasis River, Petitcodiac River, Magaguadavic River, Miramichi River, Nepisiguit River, and the Restigouche River. Although smaller, the Bouctouche River, Richibucto River and Kouchibouguac River are also important. The settlement patterns and the economy of New Brunswick are based more on the province's river systems than its seacoasts.

Northern New Brunswick is dominated by the Appalachian Mountains within the Eastern Canadian forests ecoregion, with the northwestern part of the province consisting of the remote and rugged Miramichi Highlands as well as the Chaleur Uplands and the Notre Dame Mountains, with a maximum elevation at Mount Carleton of 817 m (2,680 ft). The New Brunswick Lowlands form the eastern and central portions of the province and are part of the Gulf of St. Lawrence lowland forests ecoregion. Finally the Caledonia Highlands and St. Croix Highlands extend along the Bay of Fundy coast reaching elevations of more than 400 m (1,312 ft).

The total land and water area of the province is 72,908 km2 (28,150 sq mi), over 80 percent of which is forested. Agricultural lands are found mostly in the upper St. John River Valley, with lesser amounts of farmland in the southeast of the province, especially in the Kennebecasis and Petitcodiac river valleys. The three major urban centres are all in the southern third of the province.

History

The original First Nations inhabitants of New Brunswick were members of three distinct tribes. The largest tribe was the Mi'kmaq, and they occupied the eastern and coastal areas of the province. They were responsible for the Augustine Mound, a burial ground built about 800 B.C. near Metepnákiaq (Red Bank First Nation). The western portion of the province was the traditional home of the Wolastoqiyik (Maliseet) people. The smaller Passamaquoddy tribe occupied lands in the southwest of the province.

French colonial era

Although it is possible that Vikings may have reached as far south as New Brunswick, the first known European exploration of New Brunswick was that of French explorer Jacques Cartier in 1534, who discovered and named the Bay of Chaleur. The next French contact was in 1604, when a party led by Pierre du Gua de Monts and Samuel de Champlain set up camp for the winter on St.Croix Island, between New Brunswick and Maine. The colony relocated the following year across the Bay of Fundy to Port Royal, Nova Scotia. Over the next 150 years, a number of other French settlements and seigneuries were founded in the area occupied by present-day New Brunswick, including along the Saint John River, the upper Bay of Fundy region, in the Tantramar Marshes at Beaubassin, and finally at St. Pierre (site of present day Bathurst). The whole maritime region (as well as parts of Maine) was at that time claimed by France and was designated as the colony of Acadia.

One of the provisions of the Treaty of Utrecht of 1713 was the surrender of peninsular Nova Scotia to the British. The bulk of the Acadian population thus found themselves residing in the new British colony of Nova Scotia. The remainder of Acadia (including the New Brunswick region) was only lightly populated and poorly defended. The Maliseet from their headquarters at Meductic on the Saint John River, participated in numerous raids and battles against New England during Father Rale's War and King William's War.

During Father Le Loutre's War, in 1750, in order to protect their territorial interests in what remained of Acadia, France built three forts (Fort Beauséjour, Fort Menagoueche and Fort Gaspareaux) along the frontier with Nova Scotia. (A major French fortification (Fortress of Louisbourg) was also built on Île Royale (now Cape Breton Island) after Queen Anne's War, but the function of this fort was mostly to defend the approaches to the colony of Canada, not Acadia.)

During the French and Indian War (1754–63), the British completed their conquest of Acadia and extended their control to include all of New Brunswick. Fort Beauséjour (near Sackville), Fort Menagoueche and Fort Gaspareaux were captured by a British force commanded by Lt. Col. Robert Monckton in 1755. Inside Fort Beauséjour, the British forces found not only French regular troops, but also Acadian irregulars. Governor Charles Lawrence of Nova Scotia used the discovery of Acadian civilians helping in the defence of the fort as a pretext to order the expulsion of the Acadian population from Nova Scotia. The Acadians of the recently captured Beaubassin and Petitcodiac regions were included in the expulsion order. Some of the Acadians in the Petitcodiac and Memramcook region escaped, and under the leadership of Joseph Broussard continued to conduct guerrilla action against the British forces for a couple of years. Other actions in the war included British expeditions up the Saint John River in the St. John River Campaign. Fort Anne (Fredericton) fell during the 1759 campaign, and following this, all of present-day New Brunswick came under British control.

British colonial era

After the Seven Years' War, most of present day New Brunswick (and parts of Maine) were absorbed into the colony of Nova Scotia and designated as Sunbury County. New Brunswick's relatively isolated location on the Bay of Fundy, away from the Atlantic coastline proper tended to discourage settlement during the postwar period. There were exceptions however, such as the coming of New England Planters to the Sackville region and the arrival of Pennsylvania Dutch settlers in Moncton in 1766. In both these cases, many of the new settlers took up land that had originally belonged to displaced Acadians before the deportation.

There were several actions on New Brunswick soil during the American Revolutionary War: the Maugerville Rebellion (1776), the Battle of Fort Cumberland (1776), the Siege of Saint John (1777) and the Battle at Miramichi (1779). The Battle of Fort Cumberland was the largest and most significant of these conflicts. Following the war, significant population growth finally came to the area, when 14,000 refugee Loyalists, having lost the war, came from the newly created United States, arriving on the Saint John River in 1783. Influential Loyalists such as Harvard-educated Edward Winslow saw themselves as the natural leaders of their community and that they should be recognized for their rank and that their loyalty deserved special compensation. However they were not appreciated by the pre-loyalist population in Nova Scotia. As Colonel Thomas Dundas wrote from Saint John, "They [the loyalists] have experienced every possible injury from the old inhabitants of Nova Scotia." Therefore 55 prominent merchants and professionals petitioned for 5,000-acre (20 km2) grants each. Winslow pressed for the creation of a "Loyalist colony" – an asylum that could become "the envy of the American states".

Nova Scotia was therefore partitioned. In 1784, Britain split the colony of Nova Scotia into three separate colonies: New Brunswick, Cape Breton Island, and present-day peninsular Nova Scotia, in addition to the adjacent colonies of St. John's Island (renamed Prince Edward Island in 1798) and Newfoundland. The Colony of New Brunswick was created on August 16, 1784; Sir Thomas Carleton was appointed as Lieutenant-Governor in 1784, and in 1785 a new assembly was established with the first elections. The new colony was almost called New Ireland after a failed attempt to establish a colony of that name in Maine during the war.

Even though the bulk of the Loyalist population was located in Parrtown (Saint John), the decision was made by the colonial authorities to place the new colonial capital at St. Anne's Point (Fredericton), about 150 km up the Saint John River as it was felt that by placing the capital inland, it would be less vulnerable to American attack. The University of New Brunswick was founded at Fredericton at the same time (1785), making it the oldest English-language university in Canada and the first public university in North America.

Initial Loyalist population growth in the new colony extended along the Fundy coastline from Saint Andrews to Saint Martins and up the Kennebecasis and lower Saint John River valleys.

During the late 18th and early 19th centuries, some of the deported Acadians from Nova Scotia found their way back to "Acadie," where they settled mostly along the eastern and northern shores of the new colony of New Brunswick. Here, they lived in relative (and in many ways, self-imposed) isolation.

Additional immigration to New Brunswick in the early part of the 19th century was from Scotland; western England; and Waterford, Ireland, often after first having come through (or having lived in) Newfoundland. A large influx of settlers arrived in New Brunswick after 1845 from Ireland as a result of the Potato Famine; many of these people settled in Saint John or Chatham. Both Saint John and the Miramichi region remain largely Irish today.

The northwestern border between Maine and New Brunswick had not been clearly defined by the Treaty of Paris (1783) that had ended the American Revolution. By the late 1830s, population growth and competing lumber interests in the upper Saint John River valley created the need for a definite boundary in the area. During the winter of 1838–39, the situation quickly deteriorated, with both Maine and New Brunswick calling out their respective militias. The "Aroostook War" was bloodless (but politically very tense), and the boundary was subsequently settled by the Webster-Ashburton Treaty of 1842.

Throughout the mid 19th century, shipbuilding on the Bay of Fundy shore and also on the Petitcodiac River and rivers on the east coast became a dominant industry in New Brunswick. The Marco Polo, the fastest clipper ship ever built, was launched from Saint John in 1851. Resource-based industries such as logging and farming were also important components of the New Brunswick economy during this time and railways were constructed throughout the province to serve them and link the rural communities.

Canadian province

New Brunswick, one of the four original provinces of Canada, entered the Canadian Confederation on July 1, 1867. The Charlottetown Conference of 1864, which ultimately led to the confederation movement, originally had been intended to discuss only a Maritime Union, but concerns over the American Civil War as well as Fenian activity along the border led to an interest in expanding the scope of the proposed union. This interest in an expanded union arose from the Province of Canada (formerly Upper and Lower Canada, later Ontario and Quebec), and a request was made by the Canadian political leaders to the organizers of the Maritime conference to have the meeting agenda altered.

Although the Maritime leaders were swayed by the arguments of the Canadians, many ordinary residents of the Maritimes wanted no part of this larger confederation for fear that their interests and concerns would be ignored in a wider national union. Many politicians who supported confederation, such as Sir Samuel Leonard Tilley (New Brunswick's best-known Father of Confederation), found themselves without a seat after the next election; nevertheless, backers of the wider confederation eventually prevailed.

Following confederation, the fears of the anti-confederates were proven correct as new national policies and trade barriers were soon adopted by the central government, thus disrupting the historic trading relationship between the Maritime Provinces and New England. The situation in New Brunswick was exacerbated by both the Great Fire of 1877 in Saint John and the decline of the wooden shipbuilding industry; skilled workers were thus forced to move to other parts of Canada or to the United States to seek employment.

As the 20th century dawned, however, the province's economy again began to expand. Manufacturing gained strength with the construction of textile mills; and in the crucial forestry sector, the sawmills that had dotted inland sections of the province gave way to larger pulp and paper mills. The railway industry, meanwhile, provided for growth and prosperity in the Moncton region. Nevertheless, unemployment remained high throughout the province, and the Great Depression brought another setback. Two influential families, the Irvings and the McCains, emerged from the Depression to begin to modernise and vertically integrate the provincial economy—especially in the vital forestry, food processing, and energy sectors.

The Acadians in northern New Brunswick had long been geographically and linguistically isolated from the more numerous English speakers, who lived in the south of the province. Government services were often not available in French, and the infrastructure in predominantly Francophone areas was noticeably less developed than in the rest of the province; this changed with the election of Premier Louis Robichaud in 1960. He embarked on the ambitious Equal Opportunity Plan, in which education, rural road maintenance, and health care fell under the sole jurisdiction of a provincial government that insisted on equal coverage throughout the province. County councils were abolished, and the rural areas came under direct provincial jurisdiction. The 1969 Official Languages Act made French an official language.

Demography

Ethnicity

First Nations in New Brunswick include the Mi'kmaq and Maliseet (Wolastoqiyik). The first European settlers, the Acadians, are today descendants of survivors of the Great Expulsion (1755), which drove thousands of French residents into exile in North America, Britain, and France for refusing to take an oath of allegiance to King George III during the Seven Years' War (French and Indian War). Acadians who were deported to Louisiana are often referred to as Cajuns in English.

Much of the English Canadian population of New Brunswick is descended from Loyalists who fled the American Revolution, including a considerable number of Black Loyalists. This is commemorated in the province's motto, Spem reduxit ("hope restored"). There is also a significant population with Irish ancestry, especially in Saint John and the Miramichi Valley. People of Scottish descent are scattered throughout the province, with higher concentrations in the Miramichi and in Campbellton.

In the 2001 Canadian census, the most commonly reported ethnicities were 193,470 French (26.9%); 165,235 English (23.0%); 135,835 Irish (18.9%); 127,635 Scottish (17.7%); 27,490 German (3.8%); 26,220 Acadians (3.6%); 23,815 "North American Indian" (First Nations) (3.3%); 13,355 Dutch (Netherlands) (1.9%); and 7,620 Welsh (1.1%). It should be noted that 242,220 people (33.7%) identified themselves as simply "Canadian" or "Canadien," while 173,585 (24.1%) also selected another ethnicity—for a total of 415,810 (57.8%) calling themselves Canadian. (Each person could choose more than one ethnicity.)

Population since 1851

Languages

The 2011 Canadian census showed a population of 751,171. Of the 731,855 single responses to the census question concerning mother tongue, the most commonly reported languages were:

New Brunswick's official languages are shown in bold. Figures shown are for the number of single-language responses and the percentage of total single-language responses. During the 19th century Scottish Gaelic was also spoken in the Campbellton and Dalhousie area. The language died out as a natively-spoken language in the province in the early 20th century.

Religion

The largest denominations by number of adherents according to the 2011 National Household Survey were the Roman Catholic Church, with 366,000 (52%); Baptists, with 70,990 (8%); the United Church of Canada, with 54,265 (7%); the Anglicans, with 51,365 (7%); the Pentecostals with 18,435 (3%).

Economy

New Brunswick's urban areas have modern, service-based economies dominated by the health care, educational, retail, finance, and insurance sectors. These sectors are reasonably equitably distributed in all three principal urban centres. In addition, heavy industry and port facilities are found in Saint John; Fredericton is dominated by government services, universities, and the military; and Moncton has developed as a commercial, retail, transportation, and distribution centre with important rail and air terminal facilities.

The rural primary economy is best known for forestry, mining, mixed farming, and fishing.

Forestry is important in all areas of the province but especially in the heavily forested central regions. There are many sawmills in the smaller towns and large pulp and paper mills located in Saint John, Atholville, Miramichi, Nackawic, and Edmundston.

Heavy metals, including lead and zinc, are mined in the north around Bathurst. One of the world's largest potash deposits is located in Sussex; a second potash mine, costing over a billion dollars, is in development in the Sussex region. Oil and natural gas deposits are also being developed in the Sussex region.

Farming is concentrated in the upper Saint John River valley (in the northwest portion of the province), where the most valuable crop is potatoes. Mixed and dairy farms are found elsewhere, but especially in the southeast, concentrated in the Kennebecasis and Petitcodiac river valleys.

The most valuable fish catches are lobster, scallops and king crab. The farming of Atlantic salmon in the Passamaquoddy Bay region is an important local industry.

The largest employers in the province are the Irving group of companies, several large multinational forest companies, the government of New Brunswick, and the McCain group of companies.

Government of New Brunswick

New Brunswick has a unicameral legislature with 49 seats. Elections are held at least every five years, but may be called at any time by the Lieutenant Governor (the viceregal representative) on consultation with the Premier. The Premier is the leader of the party that holds the most seats in the legislature.

There are two dominant political parties in New Brunswick, the Liberal Party and the Progressive Conservative Party. While consistently polling approximately 10% of the electoral vote since the early 1980s, the New Democratic Party has elected few members to the Legislative Assembly. From time to time, other parties, such as the Confederation of Regions Party, have held seats in the legislature, but only on the strength of a strong protest vote.

The dynamics of New Brunswick politics are different from those of other Canadian provinces. The lack of a dominant urban centre in the province means that the government has to be responsive to issues affecting all areas of the province. In addition, the presence of a large Francophone minority dictates that consensus politics is necessary, even when there is a majority government present. In this manner, the ebb and flow of New Brunswick provincial politics parallels the federal stage.

Since 1960, the province has tended to elect a succession of young bilingual leaders. This combination of attributes has permitted recent premiers of New Brunswick to be disproportionately influential players on the federal stage. Former Premier Bernard Lord (Progressive Conservative) has been touted as a potential leader of the Conservative Party of Canada. Frank McKenna (premier, 1987–97), had been considered to be a front-runner to lead the Liberal Party of Canada. Richard Hatfield (premier, 1970–87) played an active role in the patriation of the Canadian constitution and creation of the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms. Louis Robichaud (premier, 1960–70) was responsible for a wide range of social reforms.

On September 21, 2014, the Liberal Party won the provincial election making 32-year-old Brian Gallant the new Premier. The Liberals won 27 seats (before recounts), the Conservatives won 21, and the Green Party won its first seat. In the prior election on September 27, 2010, the Progressive Conservatives won a large majority with 42 out of 55 seats by taking 16 formerly Liberal seats, making David Alward the new Premier of New Brunswick. see New Brunswick general election, 2010

A September 2010 report released by the Canadian Taxpayers Federation criticized the pensions made by members of the legislative assembly, which take 16 taxpayer dollars for every dollar contributed by the Member of the Legislative Assembly (MLA) and cost taxpayers $7.6 million annually. According to the organization, New Brunswick legislators have one of the richest pension plans in the country, after voting for an 85 percent increase two years ago.

Municipalities

Saint John is a historic city and popular port of call. The Loyalist City, as it is often referred to, is the largest in the province and the oldest in the country. The city is one of the busiest shipping ports in Canada in terms of gross tonnage. Saint John has become a major energy hub for the East Coast. It is the home of Canada's biggest oil refinery and an LNG terminal has also been constructed in the city. In addition, there are both large oil-fired and nuclear power plants located in or near the city. Due to recent prosperity, the retail, commercial, and residential sectors are currently experiencing a resurgence.

Moncton is the fastest growing metropolitan area in the province and is among the top ten fastest growing urban areas in Canada. Its economy is principally based on the transportation, distribution, information technology, commercial, and retail sectors. Moncton has a sizable Francophone Acadian minority population (35%) and became officially bilingual in 2002.

Fredericton, the capital of the province, is home to the Beaverbrook Art Gallery, the University of New Brunswick, and St. Thomas University. One of Canada's largest military bases, CFB Gagetown, is located near suburban Oromocto; which is situated just east of Fredericton. The economy of Fredericton is tied to the governmental, military, and university sectors.

Education

Public education in the province is administered by the Department of Education, a department of the Government of New Brunswick.

New Brunswick has a comprehensive parallel system of Anglophone and Francophone public schools providing education to both the primary and secondary levels. These schools are segregated by government decree. The English system developed out of a mixture of the British and American systems, reflecting the Loyalist background of so many early settlers. There are also secular and religious private schools in the province.

The New Brunswick Community College system has campuses in all regions of the province. This comprehensive trade school system offers roughly parallel programs in both official languages at either Francophone or Anglophone campuses. Each campus, however, tends to have areas of concentration to allow for specialization. There are also a number of private colleges for specialised training in the province, such as the Moncton Flight College, one of the top pilot-training academies in Canada.

There are four publicly funded secular universities and four private degree-granting institutions with religious affiliation in the province. The two comprehensive provincial universities are the University of New Brunswick and the Université de Moncton. These institutions have extensive postgraduate programs and Schools of Law. Medical education programs have also been established at both the Université de Moncton and at UNBSJ in Saint John (although affiliated with Universite de Sherbrooke and Dalhousie University respectively). Mount Allison University in Sackville is currently ranked as the best undergraduate liberal arts university in Canada and has produced 51 Rhodes Scholars, more than any other liberal arts university in the Commonwealth.

Publicly funded provincial comprehensive universities
  • University of New Brunswick (Fredericton and Saint John), Anglophone
  • Université de Moncton (Moncton, Shippagan, and Edmundston), Francophone

Publicly funded undergraduate liberal arts universities

  • St. Thomas University (Fredericton), Anglophone
  • Mount Allison University (Sackville), Anglophone

Private Christian undergraduate liberal arts university

  • Crandall University (Moncton), Anglophone

Private degree-granting religious training institutions

  • St. Stephen's University (St. Stephen), Anglophone
  • Kingswood University (Sussex), Anglophone
  • New Brunswick Bible Institute (Hartland), Anglophone

Culture

Early New Brunswick culture was aboriginal in flavour, influenced by the native populations who made their home along the coast and riverbanks until the arrival of French-speaking in the early 17th century and English-speaking settlers beginning in the mid 18th century. Aboriginal culture in turn quickly came under European influence through trade and religion. Even writing was affected; see for example, Mi'kmaq hieroglyphic writing. Aboriginal societies were gradually marginalized under the reserve system, and it was not until the late nineteenth century, through the work of Silas Rand, that the tales of Glooscap began to emerge.

As described by the political historian Arthur Doyle, an invisible line separated the two founding European cultures, beginning on the eastern outskirts of Moncton and running diagonally across the province northwest towards Grand Falls. Franco-New Brunswick (Acadie) lay to the northeast of this divide, and Anglo-New Brunswick lay to the southwest.

Doyle's characterization was made not long after government reforms by former premier Louis J. Robichaud had significantly improved the status of French-speaking Acadians within the province and initiated their journey towards cultural recognition and equality with their English-speaking counterparts.

Early New Brunswick was influenced by its colonial ties to France, England, Scotland, and Ireland as well as by its geographical proximity to New England and the arrival of about 40,000 Loyalists in 1783.

As local society was founded in forestry and seaborne endeavours, a tradition of lumber camp songs and sea shanties prevailed. Acadian cloggers and Irish and Scots step dancers competed at festivals to expressive fiddle and accordion music. The art of storytelling, well-known to the native populations, passed on to the early settlers, and poetry—whether put to music or not—was a common form of commemorating shared events, as the voice of a masterful poet or soulful musician easily conquered the province's language barriers.

Other cultural expressions were found in family gatherings and the church; both French and English cultures saw a long and early influence of ecclesiastical architecture, with Western European and American influences dominating rather than a particular vernacular sense. Poets produced the first important literary contributions in the province. Cousins Bliss Carman and Sir Charles G.D. Roberts found inspiration in the landscape, as would later writers as well. In painting, individual artists such as Anthony Flower worked in obscurity, either through design or neglect, while others such as Edward Mitchell Bannister left the province before ever developing a local influence.

Few 19th-century artists emerged, but those who did often benefited from fine arts training at Mount Allison University in Sackville, which began offering classes in 1854. The program came into its own under John A. Hammond, who served from 1893 to 1916. Alex Colville and Lawren Harris later studied and taught art there and both Christopher Pratt and Mary Pratt were trained at Mount Allison. The University’s art gallery – which opened in 1895 and is named for its patron, John Owens of Saint John – is Canada’s oldest.

In French-speaking New Brunswick, it would not be until the 1960s that a comparable institution was founded, the Université de Moncton. Then, a cultural renaissance occurred under the influence of Acadian historians and such teachers as Claude Roussel and through coffeehouses, music, and protest. An outpouring of Acadian art, literature, and music has pressed on unabated since that time. Popular exponents of modern Acadian literature and music include Antonine Maillet, Édith Butler and France Daigle. A recent New Brunswick Lieutenant-Governor, Herménégilde Chiasson, was a poet. In northwest New Brunswick and neighbouring Quebec and northern Maine, a separate French-speaking group, the Brayon, have fostered such important artists as Roch Voisine and Lenny Breau. (See also "Music of New Brunswick) Dr. John Clarence Webster and Max Aitken, 1st Baron Beaverbrook have made important endowments to provincial museums. Dr. Webster gave his art collection to the New Brunswick Museum in 1934, thereby endowing the museum with one of its greatest assets, James Barry's Death of General Wolfe, which ranks as a Canadian national treasure. Courtesy of Lord Beaverbrook, the Beaverbrook Art Gallery in Fredericton has a collection of world-renowned art, including works by Salvador Dalí and J. M. W. Turner.

The performing arts have a long tradition in New Brunswick, dating back to travelling road shows and 19th-century opera in Saint John. The early recording star Henry Burr was discovered at the Imperial Theatre in Saint John. Based in Fredericton, the most important proponent of theatre today is Theatre New Brunswick, originally under the direction of Walter Learning, which tours plays around the province; Canadian playwright Norm Foster saw his early works premiere at TNB. Other live theatre troops include Théâtre l’Escaouette in Moncton, the Théatre populaire d'Acadie in Caraquet, and Live Bait Theatre in Sackville. All three major cities have significant performance spaces. The refurbished Imperial and Capitol Theatres are found in Saint John and Moncton, respectively; the more modern Playhouse is located in Fredericton.

In modern literature, writers Alfred Bailey and Alden Nowlan dominated the New Brunswick literary scene in the last third of the 20th century and world-renowned literary critic Northrop Frye was influenced by his upbringing in Moncton. The annual Frye Festival in that city celebrates his legacy. The expatriate British poet John Thompson, who settled outside Sackville, proved influential in his short-lived career. Douglas Lochhead and K. V. Johansen are other prominent writers living in the town of Sackville. David Adams Richards, born in the Miramichi, has become a well-respected Governor-General's Award-winning author. Canadian novelist, story-writer, biographer and poet, Raymond Fraser, grew up in Chatham and lives now in Fredericton.

The Atlantic Ballet Theatre of Canada, based in Moncton and featuring Russian and European trained dancers, has recently flourished and has started touring both nationally and internationally. Symphony New Brunswick, based in Saint John, also tours extensively in the province.

Media

New Brunswick has four daily newspapers (three of which are in English), the Times & Transcript, based in Moncton and serving eastern New Brunswick. Also, there is the Telegraph-Journal, based in Saint John and is distributed province-wide, and the provincial capital daily The Daily Gleaner, based in Fredericton. The French-language daily is L'Acadie Nouvelle, based in Caraquet. There are also several weekly newspapers that are local in scope and based in the province's smaller towns and communities.

The three English-language dailies and the majority of the weeklies are owned and operated by Brunswick News, privately owned by J.K. Irving. The other major media group in the province is Acadie Presse, which publishes L'Acadie Nouvelle.

The Canadian Broadcasting Corporation has various news bureaus throughout the province, but its main Anglophone television and radio operations are centred in Fredericton. Télévision de Radio-Canada (CBC French) service is based in Moncton. Global TV is based in Halifax, with news bureaus in Fredericton, Moncton and Saint John. CTV Atlantic, the regional CTV station, is based in Halifax and has offices in Moncton, Fredericton, and Saint John. Western New Brunswick is served by WAGM-TV which broadcasts CBS and Fox stations into the province and covers New Brunswick news and weather on its NewsSource 8 broadcasts.

There are many private radio stations in New Brunswick, with each of the three major cities having a dozen or more stations. Most smaller cities and towns also have one or two stations. Due to all this many Regional interests, were crested in New Brunswick.

Tourism

New Brunswick is divided into five scenic drives: Fundy Coastal Drive, Acadian Coastal Drive, River Valley Scenic Drive, Miramichi River Route and Appalachian Range Route. Provincial and Municipal Visitor Information Centres are located throughout each drive.

Aside from Saint John's large tourism industry from cruise ships, some of the province's tourist attractions include the New Brunswick Museum, Minister's Island, the Beaverbrook Art Gallery, Grand Manan Island, Kings Landing Historical Settlement, Village Historique Acadien, Les Jardins de la République, Hopewell Rocks, La Dune de Bouctouche, Saint John Reversing Falls, Magnetic Hill and the Magnetic Hill Zoo, Crystal Palace, Magic Mountain Water Park, Casino New Brunswick, Cape Jourimain National Wildlife Preserve, Sackville Waterfowl Park, and the 41 km (25 mi) Fundy Hiking Trail.

Parks

Provincial Parks: de la République, Herring Cove, Mactaquac, Mount Carleton, Murray Beach, New River Beach, Parlee Beach, Sugarloaf, The Anchorage

National Parks: Fundy National Park, Kouchibouguac National Park

International Parks: Roosevelt Campobello International Park

Notable people


Photo gallery

See also

  • Bibliography of New Brunswick
  • Counties of New Brunswick
  • Royal eponyms in Canada
  • Scouting and Guiding in New Brunswick
  • New Brunswick Environmental and Heritage Acts

Lists:

  • List of airports in New Brunswick
  • List of communities in New Brunswick
  • List of museums in New Brunswick
  • List of National Historic Sites in New Brunswick
  • List of historic places in New Brunswick
  • List of nature centres in New Brunswick
  • List of New Brunswick general elections (post-Confederation)
  • List of parishes in New Brunswick
  • List of people from New Brunswick
  • List of rivers of New Brunswick
  • List of schools in New Brunswick

References

Further reading

External links

  • Official site of the Government of New Brunswick
  • Official site of Tourism New Brunswick
  • New Brunswick at the Department of Canadian Heritage
  • New Brunswick at DMOZ
  • Maritime Tourism
  • Symbols of New Brunswick
  • New Brunswick Museum
  • New Brunswick Lighthouses
  • Historical and Genealogical Resources of New Brunswick historical census, birth, marriage and death records, immigration, settlement, biography, cemeteries, burial records, land records, First Nations and more
  • From Louis to Lord: New Brunswick Elections, 1960–2003

New Jersey

New Jersey is a state in the Northeastern and Middle Atlantic regions of the United States. It is bordered on the north and east by New York State, on the southeast and south by the Atlantic Ocean, on the west by Pennsylvania, and on the southwest by Delaware. New Jersey is the fourth-smallest state, but the 11th-most populous and the most densely populated of the 50 United States. New Jersey lies entirely within the combined statistical areas of New York City and Philadelphia. It is also the second-wealthiest U.S. state by median household income, according to the 2008–2012 American Community Survey.

The area was inhabited by Native Americans for more than 2,800 years, with historical tribes such as the Lenape along the coast. In the early 17th century, the Dutch and the Swedes made the first European settlements. The English later seized control of the region, naming it the Province of New Jersey. It was granted as a colony to Sir George Carteret and John Berkeley, 1st Baron Berkeley of Stratton. At this time, it was named after the largest of the Channel Islands, Jersey, Carteret's birthplace. New Jersey was the site of several decisive battles during the American Revolutionary War.

In the 19th century, factories in cities such as Camden, Paterson, Newark, Trenton, and Elizabeth helped to drive the Industrial Revolution. New Jersey's geographic location at the center of the Northeast megalopolis, between Boston and New York City to the northeast, and Philadelphia, Baltimore, and Washington, D.C., to the southwest, fueled its rapid growth through the process of suburbanization in the 1950s and beyond.

History

Around 180 million years ago, during the Jurassic Period, New Jersey bordered North Africa. The pressure of the collision between North America and Africa gave rise to the Appalachian Mountains. Around 18,000 years ago, the Ice Age resulted in glaciers that reached New Jersey. As the glaciers retreated, they left behind Lake Passaic, as well as many rivers, swamps, and gorges.

New Jersey was originally settled by Native Americans, with the Lenni-Lenape being dominant at the time of contact. Scheyichbi is the Lenape name for the land that is now New Jersey. The Lenape were several autonomous groups that practiced maize agriculture in order to supplement their hunting and gathering in the region surrounding the Delaware River, the lower Hudson River, and western Long Island Sound. The Lenape society was divided into matrilinear clans that were based upon common female ancestors. These clans were organized into three distinct phratries identified by their animal sign: Turtle, Turkey, and Wolf. They first encountered the Dutch in the early 17th century, and their primary relationship with the Europeans was through fur trade.

Colonial era

The Dutch became the first Europeans to lay claim to lands in New Jersey. The Dutch colony of New Netherland consisted of parts of modern Middle Atlantic states. Although the European principle of land ownership was not recognized by the Lenape, Dutch West India Company policy required their colonists to purchase land which they settled. The first to do so was Michiel Pauw who established a patronship named Pavonia along the North River which eventually became the Bergen. Peter Minuit's purchase of lands along the Delaware River establish the colony of New Sweden. The entire region became a territory of England on June 24, 1664, after an English fleet under the command of Colonel Richard Nicolls sailed into what is today New York Harbor and took control of Fort Amsterdam, annexing the entire province.

During the English Civil War, the Channel Island of Jersey remained loyal to the British Crown and gave sanctuary to the King. It was from the Royal Square in St. Helier that Charles II of England was first proclaimed King in 1649, following the execution of his father, Charles I. The North American lands were divided by Charles II, who gave his brother, the Duke of York (later King James II), the region between New England and Maryland as a proprietary colony (as opposed to a royal colony). James then granted the land between the Hudson River and the Delaware River (the land that would become New Jersey) to two friends who had remained loyal through the English Civil War: Sir George Carteret and Lord Berkeley of Stratton. The area was named the Province of New Jersey.

Since the state's inception, New Jersey has been characterized by ethnic and religious diversity. New England Congregationalists settled alongside Scots Presbyterians and Dutch Reformed migrants. While the majority of residents lived in towns with individual landholdings of 100 acres (40 ha), a few rich proprietors owned vast estates. English Quakers and Anglicans owned large landholdings. Unlike Plymouth Colony, Jamestown and other colonies, New Jersey was populated by a secondary wave of immigrants who came from other colonies instead of those who migrated directly from Europe. New Jersey remained agrarian and rural throughout the colonial era, and commercial farming only developed sporadically. Some townships, such as Burlington on the Delaware River and Perth Amboy, emerged as important ports for shipping to New York City and Philadelphia. The colony's fertile lands and tolerant religious policy drew more settlers, and New Jersey's population had increased to 120,000 by 1775.

Settlement for the first 10 years of English rule took place along Hackensack River and Arthur Kill – settlers came primarily from New York and New England. On March 18, 1673, Berkeley sold his half of the colony to Quakers in England, who settled the Delaware Valley region as a Quaker colony. (William Penn acted as trustee for the lands for a time.) New Jersey was governed very briefly as two distinct provinces, East and West Jersey, for 28 years between 1674 and 1702, at times part of the Province of New York or Dominion of New England.

In 1702, the two provinces were reunited under a royal, rather than a proprietary, governor. Edward Hyde, Lord Cornbury, became the first governor of the colony as a royal colony. Britain believed that he was an ineffective and corrupt ruler, taking bribes and speculating on land. In 1708 he was recalled to England. New Jersey was then ruled by the governors of New York, but this infuriated the settlers of New Jersey, who accused those governors of favoritism to New York. Judge Lewis Morris led the case for a separate governor, and was appointed governor by King George II in 1738.

Revolutionary War era

New Jersey was one of the Thirteen Colonies that revolted against British rule in the American Revolution. The New Jersey Constitution of 1776 was passed July 2, 1776, just two days before the Second Continental Congress declared American Independence from Great Britain. It was an act of the Provincial Congress, which made itself into the state Legislature. To reassure neutrals, it provided that it would become void if New Jersey reached reconciliation with Great Britain.

New Jersey representatives Richard Stockton, John Witherspoon, Francis Hopkinson, John Hart, and Abraham Clark were among those who signed the United States Declaration of Independence.

During the American Revolutionary War, British and American armies crossed New Jersey numerous times, and several pivotal battles took place in the state. Because of this, New Jersey today is often referred to as "The Crossroads of the Revolution." The winter quarters of the revolutionary army were established there twice by General George Washington in Morristown, which was called the military capital of the revolution.

On the night of December 25–26, 1776, the Continental Army under George Washington crossed the Delaware River. After the crossing, he surprised and defeated the Hessian troops in the Battle of Trenton. Slightly more than a week after victory at Trenton, American forces gained an important victory by stopping General Cornwallis's charges at the Second Battle of Trenton. By evading Cornwallis's army, Washington made a surprise attack on Princeton and successfully defeated the British forces there on January 3, 1777. Emanuel Leutze's painting of Washington Crossing the Delaware became an icon of the Revolution.

American forces under Washington met the forces under General Henry Clinton at the Battle of Monmouth in an indecisive engagement in June 1778. Washington attempted to take the British column by surprise; when the British army attempted to flank the Americans, the Americans retreated in disorder. The ranks were later reorganized and withstood the British charges.

In the summer of 1783, the Continental Congress met in Nassau Hall at Princeton University, making Princeton the nation's capital for four months. It was there that the Continental Congress learned of the signing of the Treaty of Paris (1783), which ended the war.

On December 18, 1787, New Jersey became the third state to ratify the United States Constitution, which was overwhelmingly popular in New Jersey, as it prevented New York and Pennsylvania from charging and keeping tariffs on goods imported from Europe. On November 20, 1789, the state became the first in the newly formed Union to ratify the Bill of Rights.

The 1776 New Jersey State Constitution gave the vote to "all inhabitants" who had a certain level of wealth. This included women and blacks, but not married women, because they could not own property separately from their husbands. Both sides, in several elections, claimed that the other side had had unqualified women vote and mocked them for use of "petticoat electors" (entitled to vote or not); on the other hand, both parties passed Voting Rights Acts. In 1807, the legislature passed a bill interpreting the constitution to mean universal white male suffrage, excluding paupers. (This was less revolutionary than it sounds: the "constitution" was itself only an act of the legislature.)

19th century

On February 15, 1804, New Jersey became the last northern state to abolish new slavery and enacted legislation that slowly phased out existing slavery. This led to a gradual decrease of the slave population. By the close of the Civil War about a dozen African Americans in New Jersey were still held in bondage. New Jersey voters initially refused to ratify the constitutional amendments banning slavery and granting rights to the United States' black population.

Industrialization accelerated in the northern part of the state following completion of the Morris Canal in 1831. The canal allowed for coal to be brought from eastern Pennsylvania's Lehigh Valley to northern New Jersey's growing industries in Paterson, Newark and Jersey City.

In 1844, the second state constitution was ratified and brought into effect. Counties thereby became districts for the State Senate, and some realignment of boundaries (including the creation of Mercer County) immediately followed. This provision was retained in the 1947 Constitution, but was overturned by the Supreme Court of the United States in 1962 by the decision Baker v. Carr. While the Governorship was stronger than under the 1776 constitution, the constitution of 1844 created many offices that were not responsible to him, or to the people, and it gave him a three-year term, but he could not succeed himself.

New Jersey was one of the few Union states (the others being Delaware and Kentucky) to select a candidate other than Abraham Lincoln twice in national elections, and sided with Stephen Douglas (1860) and George B. McClellan (1864) during their campaigns. McClellan, a native Philadelphian, had New Jersey ties and formally resided in New Jersey at the time; he later became Governor of New Jersey (1878–81). (In New Jersey, the fractions of the Democratic party managed an effective coalition in 1860.) During the American Civil War, the state was led first by Republican Governor Charles Smith Olden, then by Democrat Joel Parker. During the course of the war, over 80,000 from the state enlisted in the Northern army; unlike many states, including some Northern ones, no battle was fought there.

In the Industrial Revolution, cities like Paterson grew and prospered. Previously, the economy had been largely agrarian, which was problematically subject to crop failures and poor soil. This caused a shift to a more industrialized economy, one based on manufactured commodities such as textiles and silk. Inventor Thomas Edison also became an important figure of the Industrial Revolution, having been granted 1,093 patents, many of which for inventions he developed while working in New Jersey. Edison's facilities, first at Menlo Park and then in West Orange, are considered perhaps the first research centers in the U.S. Christie Street in Menlo Park was the first thoroughfare in the world to have electric lighting. Transportation was greatly improved as locomotion and steamboats were introduced to New Jersey.

Iron mining was also a leading industry during the middle to late 19th century. Bog iron pits in the southern New Jersey Pinelands were among the first sources of iron for the new nation. Mines such as Mt. Hope, Mine Hill and the Rockaway Valley Mines created a thriving industry. Mining generated the impetus for new towns and was one of the driving forces behind the need for the Morris Canal. Zinc mines were also a major industry, especially the Sterling Hill Mine.

20th century

Through both World Wars, New Jersey was a center for war production, especially in naval construction. Battleships, cruisers, and destroyers were all made in this state. New Jersey manufactured 6.8 percent of total United States military armaments produced during World War II, ranking fifth among the 48 states. In addition, Fort Dix (1917) (originally called "Camp Dix"), Camp Merritt (1917) and Camp Kilmer (1941) were all constructed to house and train American soldiers through both World Wars. New Jersey also became a principal location for defense in the Cold War. Fourteen Nike Missile stations were constructed, especially for the defense of New York City and Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. PT-109, a motor torpedo boat commanded by Lt. (j.g.) John F. Kennedy in World War II, was built at the Elco Boatworks in Bayonne. The aircraft carrier USS Enterprise (CV-6) was briefly docked at the Military Ocean Terminal in Bayonne in the 1950s before she was sent to Kearney to be scrapped. In 1962, the world's first nuclear-powered cargo ship, the NS Savannah, was launched at Camden.

New Jersey prospered through the Roaring Twenties. The first Miss America Pageant was held in 1921 in Atlantic City, the Holland Tunnel connecting Jersey City to Manhattan opened in 1927, and the first drive-in movie was shown in 1933 in Camden. During the Great Depression of the 1930s, the state offered begging licenses to unemployed residents, the zeppelin airship Hindenburg crashed in flames over Lakehurst, and the SS Morro Castle beached itself near Asbury Park after going up in flames while at sea.

In 1951, the New Jersey Turnpike opened, permitting fast travel by car and truck between North Jersey (and metropolitan New York) and South Jersey (and metropolitan Philadelphia).

In the 1960s, race riots erupted in many of the industrial cities of North Jersey. The first race riots in New Jersey occurred in Jersey City on August 2, 1964. Several others ensued in 1967, in Newark and Plainfield. Other riots followed the assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. in April 1968, just as in the rest of the country. A riot occurred in Camden in 1971.

As a result of an order from the New Jersey Supreme Court to fund schools equitably, the New Jersey legislature passed an income tax bill in 1976. Prior to this bill, the state had no income tax.

21st century

In the early part of the 2000s, two light rail systems were opened: the Hudson–Bergen Light Rail in Hudson County and the River Line between Camden and Trenton. The intent of these projects were to encourage transit-oriented development in North Jersey and South Jersey, respectively. The HBLR in particular was credited with a revitalization of Hudson County and Jersey City in particular. Urban revitalization has continued in North Jersey in the 21st century. Jersey City continued to grow. In 2010 Newark experienced its first population increase since the 1950s.

Rutgers and Seton Hall competed in the Big East Conference until 2013. The rivalry between the two teams has been intense. In 2013, Seton Hall, along with the other non-Football Bowl Subdivision schools in the Big East, split and formed a new Big East Conference.

Geography

New Jersey is bordered on the north and northeast by New York (parts of which are across the Hudson River, Upper New York Bay, the Kill Van Kull, Newark Bay, and the Arthur Kill); on the east by the Atlantic Ocean; on the southwest by Delaware across Delaware Bay; and on the west by Pennsylvania across the Delaware River.

New Jersey can be thought of as five regions, based on natural geography and population. Northeastern New Jersey, the Gateway Region, lies closest to Manhattan in New York City, and many residents commute into the city to work. Northwestern New Jersey, or the "Skylands", is, compared to the northeast, more wooded, rural, and mountainous. The "Shore", along the Atlantic Coast in the central-east and southeast, has its own natural, residential, and lifestyle characteristics owing to its location by the ocean. The Delaware Valley includes the southwestern counties of the state, which reside within the Philadelphia Metropolitan Area. The fifth region is the Pine Barrens in the interior of the southern part. Covered rather extensively by mixed pine and oak forest, it has a much lower population density than much of the rest of the state.

New Jersey also can be broadly divided into three geographic regions: North Jersey, Central Jersey, and South Jersey. Some New Jersey residents do not consider Central Jersey a region in its own right, but others believe it is a separate geographic and cultural area from the North and South.

The federal Office of Management and Budget divides New Jersey's counties into seven Metropolitan Statistical Areas, including sixteen counties in the New York City or Philadelphia metro areas. Four counties have independent metro areas, and Warren County is part of the Pennsylvania-based Lehigh Valley metro area. (See Metropolitan Statistical Areas of New Jersey for details.)

It is also at the center of the Northeast megalopolis.

Additionally, the New Jersey Commerce, Economic Growth, & Tourism Commission divides the state into six distinct regions to facilitate the state's tourism industry. The regions are:

  • Gateway Region, encompassing Middlesex County, Union County, Essex County, Hudson County, Bergen County, and Passaic County.
  • Skylands Region, encompassing Sussex County, Morris County, Warren County, Hunterdon County, and Somerset County.
  • Shore Region, encompassing Monmouth County and Ocean County.
  • Delaware River Region, encompassing Mercer County, Burlington County, Camden County, Gloucester County, and Salem County.
  • Greater Atlantic City Region, encompassing Atlantic County.
  • Southern Shore Region, encompassing Cumberland County and Cape May County.

High Point, in Montague Township, Sussex County, is the highest elevation, at 1,803 feet (550 m). The Palisades are a line of steep cliffs on the lower west side of the Hudson River, in Bergen County and Hudson County.

Major rivers include the Hudson, Delaware, Raritan, Passaic, Hackensack, Rahway, Musconetcong, Mullica, Rancocas, Manasquan, Maurice, and Toms rivers.

Sandy Hook, along the eastern coast, is a popular recreational beach. It is a barrier spit and an extension of the Barnegat Peninsula along the state's Atlantic Ocean coast.

Long Beach Island ("LBI"), a barrier island along the eastern coast, has popular recreational beaches. The primary access point to the island is by a single bridge connection to the mainland. Barnegat Lighthouse is on the northern tip.

Areas managed by the National Park Service include:

  • Appalachian National Scenic Trail
  • Delaware National Scenic River
  • Delaware Water Gap National Recreation Area
  • Ellis Island National Monument
  • Gateway National Recreation Area in Monmouth County
  • Great Egg Harbor River
  • Morristown National Historical Park in Morristown
  • New Jersey Coastal Heritage Trail Route
  • New Jersey Pinelands National Reserve
  • Paterson Great Falls National Historical Park
  • Thomas Edison National Historical Park in West Orange

Prominent geographic features include:

  • Delaware Water Gap
  • Great Swamp National Wildlife Refuge
  • The Highlands
  • New Jersey Meadowlands
  • Pine Barrens
  • South Mountain

Climate

There are two climatic conditions in the state. The south, central, and northeast parts of the state have a humid mesothermal climate, while the northwest has a humid continental climate (microthermal), with much cooler temperatures due to higher elevation. New Jersey receives between 2,400 and 2,800 hours of sunshine annually.

Summers are typically hot and humid, with statewide average high temperatures of 82–87 °F (28–31 °C) and lows of 60–69 °F (16–21 °C); however, temperatures exceed 90 °F (32 °C) on average 25 days each summer, exceeding 100 °F (38 °C) in some years. Winters are usually cold, with average high temperatures of 34–43 °F (1–6 °C) and lows of 16 to 28 °F (−9 to −2 °C) for most of the state, but temperatures could, for brief interludes, fall below 10 °F (−12 °C) and occasionally rise above 50 °F (10 °C). Northwestern parts of the state have significantly colder winters with sub-0 °F (−18 °C) being an almost annual occurrence. Spring and autumn may feature wide temperature variations, with lower humidity than summer. The USDA Plant Hardiness Zone classification ranges from 6 in the northwest of the state, to between 7B and 8A near Cape May.

Average annual precipitation ranges from 43 to 51 inches (1,100 to 1,300 mm), uniformly spread through the year. Average snowfall per winter season ranges from 10–15 inches (25–38 cm) in the south and near the seacoast, 15–30 inches (38–76 cm) in the northeast and central part of the state, to about 40–50 inches (1.0–1.3 m) in the northwestern highlands, but this often varies considerably from year to year. Precipitation falls on an average of 120 days a year, with 25 to 30 thunderstorms, most of which occur during the summer.

During winter and early spring, New Jersey can experience "nor'easters", which are capable of causing blizzards or flooding throughout the northeastern United States. Hurricanes and tropical storms (such as Tropical Storm Floyd in 1999), tornadoes, and earthquakes are rare, although New Jersey was severely impacted by Hurricane Sandy on October 29, 2012 with the storm making landfall in the state at 90 mph.

Demographics

State population

The United States Census Bureau estimates that the population of New Jersey was 8,899,339 on July 1, 2013, a 1.2% increase since the 2010 United States Census. Residents of New Jersey are most commonly referred to as "New Jerseyans" or, less commonly, as "New Jerseyites". As of the 2010 census, there were 8,791,894 people residing in the state. The racial makeup of the state was:

  • 68.6% White American
  • 13.7% African American
  • 0.3% Native American
  • 8.3% Asian American
  • 6.4% other races
  • 2.7% Multiracial American

17.7% of the population were Hispanic or Latino (of any race).

Non-Hispanic Whites were 58.9% of the population in 2011, down from 85% in 1970.

In 2010, undocumented immigrants constituted an estimated 6.4% of the population. This was the fourth highest percentage of any state in the country. There were an estimated 550,000 illegal immigrants in the state in 2010.

The United States Census Bureau, as of July 1, 2009, estimated New Jersey's population at 8,707,739, which represents an increase of 268,301, or 3.2%, since the last census in 2000. This includes a natural increase since the last census of 343,965 people (that is, 933,185 births minus 589,220 deaths) and a decrease due to net migration of 53,930 people out of the state. Immigration from outside the United States resulted in a net increase of 384,687 people, and migration within the country produced a net loss of 438,617 people. As of 2005, there were 1.6 million foreign-born living in the state (accounting for 19.2% of the population).

As of 2010, New Jersey is the eleventh-most populous state in the United States, and the most densely populated, at 1,185 residents per square mile (458 per km2), with most of the population residing in the counties surrounding New York City, Philadelphia, and along the eastern Jersey Shore, while the extreme southern and northwestern counties are relatively less dense overall. It is also the second wealthiest state according to the U.S. Census Bureau.

The center of population for New Jersey is located in Middlesex County, in the town of Milltown, just east of the New Jersey Turnpike.

New Jersey is home to more scientists and engineers per square mile than anywhere else in the world.

On October 21, 2013, same-sex marriages commenced in New Jersey.

New Jersey is one of the most ethnically and religiously diverse states in the country. As of 2011, 56.4% of New Jersey's children under the age of one belonged to racial or ethnic minority groups, meaning that they had at least one parent who was not non-Hispanic white. It has the second largest Jewish population by percentage (after New York); the second largest Muslim population by percentage (after Michigan); the largest population of Peruvian Americans in the United States; the largest population of Cubans outside of Florida; the third highest Asian population by percentage; and the third highest Italian population by percentage, according to the 2000 Census. African Americans, Hispanics, Arabs, and Brazilian and Portuguese Americans are also high in number. New Jersey has the third highest Asian Indian population of any state by absolute numbers. It has the third largest Korean population, fourth largest Filipino population, and fourth largest Chinese population, per the 2010 U.S. Census. The five largest ethnic groups in 2000 were: Italian (17.9%), Irish (15.9%), African (13.6%), German (12.6%), Polish (6.9%).

Newark was the fourth poorest of U.S. cities with over 250,000 residents in 2008, but New Jersey as a whole has the second highest median household income. This is largely because so much of New Jersey consists of suburbs, most of them affluent, of New York City and Philadelphia. New Jersey is also the most densely populated state, and the only state that has had every one of its counties deemed "urban" as defined by the Census Bureau's Combined Statistical Area.

In 2010, 6.2% of its population was reported as under age 5, 23.5% under 18, and 13.5% were 65 or older; and females made up approximately 51.3% of the population.

Languages

As of 2010, 71.31% (5,830,812) of New Jersey residents age 5 and older spoke English at home as a primary language, while 14.59% (1,193,261) spoke Spanish, 1.23% (100,217) Chinese (which includes Cantonese and Mandarin), 1.06% (86,849) Italian, 1.06% (86,486) Portuguese, 0.96% (78,627) Tagalog, and Korean was spoken as a main language by 0.89% (73,057) of the population over the age of five. In total, 28.69% (2,345,644) of New Jersey's population age 5 and older spoke a mother language other than English.

A diverse stable of languages has since evolved amongst the state's population, given that New Jersey has become cosmopolitan and is home to ethnic enclaves of non-English-speaking communities:

  • Albanian (shqip) – Paterson
  • Arabic (العربية) – Paterson, Jersey City
  • Armenian (հայերեն) – Bergen County
  • Bengali (বাংলা) – Paterson
  • Cantonese (廣州話)
  • Farsi (فارسی) - Bergen County
  • Greek (ελληνικά) – Bergen County
  • Gujarati (ગુજરાતી)
  • Hebrew (עִבְרִית)
  • Hindi (हिन्दी)
  • Italian (italiano)
  • Japanese (日本語) – Edgewater and Fort Lee boroughs in Bergen County
  • Kannada (ಕನ್ನಡ)
  • Korean (한국어) – Bergen County
  • Macedonian (македонски јазик) – Bergen County
  • Malayalam (മലയാളം) – Bergen County
  • Mandarin Chinese (官話)
  • Marathi (मराठी)
  • Polish (język polski)
  • Portuguese (português) – Ironbound section of Newark, Elizabeth
  • Punjabi (ਪੰਜਾਬੀ)
  • Russian (ру́сский язы́к) – Fair Lawn borough of Bergen County
  • Spanish (español)
  • Tagalog (wikang Tagalog)
  • Tamil (தமிழ்)
  • Telugu (తెలుగు)
  • Turkish (türkçe) – Little Istanbul section of Paterson
  • Ukrainian (українська мова)
  • Urdu (اُردُو)
  • Vietnamese (tiếng Việt) – Atlantic City, Camden, Edison Township, Jersey City
  • Yiddish (ייִדיש) – Lakewood Township, Ocean County

Religion

 *Less than 0.5%

By number of adherents, the largest denominations in New Jersey according to the Association of Religion Data Archives in 2010 were the Roman Catholic Church with 3,235,290; Islam with 160,666; and the United Methodist Church with 138,052.

Major cities

For its overall population and nation-leading population density, New Jersey has a relative paucity of classic large cities. That said, many urban areas extend far beyond the limits of a single large city, as New Jersey cities (and indeed municipalities in general) tend to be geographically small; three of the four largest cities in New Jersey by population have under 20 square miles of land area, and eight of the top ten, including all of the top five have land area under 30 square miles. As of the United States 2010 Census, only four municipalities had populations in excess of 100,000, although Edison and Woodbridge came very close.

Wealth of municipalities

Economy

The Bureau of Economic Analysis estimates that New Jersey's gross state product in 2010 was $487 billion. As of January 2012, the state's unemployment rate is 9%, with the highest unemployment rate for veterans in the country at 10.8 percent. New Jersey's estimated taxpayer burden in 2011 was $37,000 per taxpayer, 49th in the nation.

Affluence

New Jersey's per capita gross state product in 2008 was $54,699, second in the U.S. and above the national per capita gross domestic product of $46,588. Its per capita income was the third highest in the nation with $51,358. In 2013, the state had the second-largest number of millionaires per capita in the United States (ratio of 7.49%), according to a study by Phoenix Marketing International. It is ranked 2nd in the nation by the number of places with per capita incomes above national average with 76.4%. Nine of New Jersey's counties are in the wealthiest 100 of the country.

Fiscal policy

New Jersey has seven tax brackets for determining income tax rates. The rates range from 1.4 to 8.97%. The standard sales tax rate is 7%, applicable to all retail sales unless specifically exempt by law. Tax exemptions include most food items for at-home preparation, medications, clothing (except fur items), footwear, and disposable paper products for use in the home. Approximately 30 New Jersey municipalities are designated as Urban Enterprise Zones, in which shoppers are charged a 3½% sales tax rate, half of the rate charged outside the UEZs. Sections of Paterson, Elizabeth, and Jersey City are examples of communities that are subject to the lower sales tax rate.

New Jersey has the highest tax rate of all 50 states with residents paying a total of $68 billion in state and local taxes annually with a per capita burden of $7,816 at a rate of 12.9% of income. All real property located in the state is subject to property tax unless specifically exempted by statute. New Jersey does not assess an intangible personal property tax, but it does impose an inheritance tax.

Federal taxation disparity

New Jersey has the highest proportional disparity of any state in the United States between what it gives to the federal government and what it receives. In fiscal year 2005, New Jersey taxpayers gave the federal government $77 billion, while only receiving $55 billion. This difference is higher than any other state and means that for every $1 New Jersey taxpayers send to Washington, the state only receives $0.61 in return. This calculation is applied correctly after making the federal government deficit neutral, as sometimes the federal government spends more than it receives. As of 2005, New Jersey has never been above 48th in rank for per capita federal spending (with a rank of 50th for the majority of that time) since 1982, while being second or third in per capita federal taxes paid to Washington.

New Jersey has one of the highest tax burdens in the nation. Factors for this include the large federal tax liability which is not adjusted for New Jersey's higher cost of living and Medicaid funding formulas. As shown by the study, incomes tend to be higher in New Jersey, which puts those in higher tax brackets especially vulnerable to the alternative minimum tax.

Industries

New Jersey's economy is centered on the pharmaceutical industry, the financial industry, chemical development, telecommunications, food processing, electric equipment, printing, publishing, and tourism. New Jersey's agricultural outputs are nursery stock, horses, vegetables, fruits and nuts, seafood, and dairy products. New Jersey ranks second among states in blueberry production, third in cranberries and spinach, and fourth in bell peppers, peaches, and head lettuce. New Jersey harvests the fourth-largest number of acres planted with asparagus.

Although New Jersey is home to many energy-intensive industries, its energy consumption is only 2.7% of the U.S. total, and its carbon dioxide emissions are only 0.8% of the U.S. total. Its comparatively low greenhouse gas emissions can be attributed to nuclear power. According to the Energy Information Administration, nuclear power dominates New Jersey's electricity market, typically supplying more than one-half of State generation. New Jersey has three nuclear power plants, including the Oyster Creek Nuclear Generating Station, which came online in 1969 and is the oldest operating nuclear plant in the country.

New Jersey has a strong scientific economy and is home to major pharmaceutical and telecommunications firms. There is also a strong service economy in New Jersey serving residents who work in New York City or Philadelphia in retail sales, education, and real estate. Furthermore, New Jersey draws upon its large and well-educated labor pool, which also supports the myriad of industries that exists today.

Shipping is a strong industry in New Jersey because of the state's strategic location, the Port of New York and New Jersey the busiest on the East Coast. The Port Newark-Elizabeth Marine Terminal was the world's first container port and is one of the world's largest container ports. New Jersey also has a strong presence in chemical development, refining, and food processing operations.

New Jersey hosts several business headquarters, including twenty-four Fortune 500 companies. Paramus in Bergen County has become the top retail zip code in the United States, with the municipality generating over $5 billion in annual retail sales. Several New Jersey counties such as Somerset (7), Morris (10), Hunterdon (13), Bergen (21), Monmouth (42) counties are ranked among the highest-income counties in the United States. Four others are also in the top 100.

Tourism

New Jersey's location as a crossroads of commerce and its extensive transportation system have put over one third of all United States residents and many Canadian residents within overnight distance by land. This accessibility to consumer revenue has enabled seaside resorts such as Atlantic City and the remainder of the Jersey Shore, as well as the state's other natural and cultural attractions, to contribute significantly to New Jersey's record tourism revenue of $40.3 billion and 87.2 million tourist visitations in 2013.

Gambling

In 1976, a referendum of New Jersey voters approved casino gambling in Atlantic City, where the first legalized casino opened in 1978. At that time, Las Vegas was the only mega-casino resort. Several casinos lie along the Atlantic City Boardwalk, the first and longest boardwalk in the world. On February 26, 2013, Governor Chris Christie signed online gambling into law. Atlantic City experienced a dramatic contraction in its stature as a gambling destination after 2010, including the closure of multiple casinos in 2014, spurred by competition from the advent of legalized gambling in other northeastern U.S. states.

Natural resources

Almost half of New Jersey is wooded. The chief tree of the northern forests is the oak. Jersey oak has been used extensively in shipbuilding. The Pine Barrens, consisting of pine forests, are in the southern part of the state.

Some mining activity does still take place in the area in and around the Franklin Furnace, which was a center of zinc production from 1848 until the late 20th century by the New Jersey Zinc Company.

New Jersey is second in the nation in solar power installations, enabled by one of the country's most favorable net metering policies, and the renewable energy certificates program. The state has more than 10,000 solar installations.

Education

In 2010, there were 605 school districts in the state.

Secretary of Education Rick Rosenberg, appointed by Governor Jon Corzine, created the Education Advancement Initiative (EAI) to increase college admission rates by 10% for New Jersey's high school students, decrease dropout rates by 15%, and increase the amount of money devoted to schools by 10%. Rosenberg retracted this plan when criticized for taking the money out of healthcare to fund this initiative.

In 2010 the state government paid all of the teachers' premiums for health insurance.

Census data reveal that New Jersey spent more per each public school student than any other state except New York in 2009, amounting to $16,271 spent per pupil, with 41% of the revenue derived from state sources.

According to 2011 Newsweek statistics, students of High Technology High School in Lincroft, Monmouth County and Bergen County Academies in Hackensack, Bergen County registered average SAT scores of 2145 and 2100, respectively, representing the highest and second-highest scores, respectively, of all listed U.S. high schools.

Princeton University in Princeton, Mercer County, was ranked the top U.S. national university of 2015 per U.S. News & World Report. In 2013, Rutgers University gained medical and dental schools intended to augment its profile as a national research university.

In 2014, New Jersey's school systems were ranked at the top of all fifty U.S. states by financial website Wallethub.com.

Media and communication

Newspapers

Major New Jersey newspapers including the following:

On-line news

Since 2006 there have been a growing number of hyperlocal news sites. These sites provide relevant news for their respective communities.

Radio stations

Television and film

Motion picture technology was developed by Thomas Edison, with much of his early work done at his West Orange laboratory. Edison's Black Maria was the first motion picture studio. America's first motion picture industry started in 1907 in Fort Lee and the first studio was constructed there in 1909. DuMont Laboratories in Passaic, developed early sets and made the first broadcast to the private home.

A number of television shows and films have been filmed in New Jersey. Since 1978, the state has maintained a Motion Picture and Television Commission to encourage filming in-state. New Jersey has long offered tax credits to television producers. Governor Chris Christie suspended the credits in 2010, but the New Jersey State Legislature in 2011 approved the restoration and expansion of the tax credit program. Under bills passed by both the state Senate and Assembly, the program offers 20 percent tax credits (22% in urban enterprise zones) to television and film productions that shoot in the state and meet set standards for hiring and local spending.

Transportation

Roadways

The New Jersey Turnpike is one of the most prominent and heavily traveled roadways in the United States. This toll road carries interstate traffic between Delaware and New York, and the East Coast in general. Commonly referred to as simply "the Turnpike," it is known for its numerous rest-areas named after prominent New Jerseyans as diverse as inventor Thomas Edison; United States Secretary of the Treasury Alexander Hamilton; United States Presidents Grover Cleveland and Woodrow Wilson; writers James Fenimore Cooper, Joyce Kilmer, and Walt Whitman; patriot Molly Pitcher; Red Cross founder Clara Barton; and football coach Vince Lombardi.

The Garden State Parkway, or simply "the Parkway," carries more in-state traffic and runs from the town of Montvale along New Jersey's northern border to its southernmost tip at Cape May for 172.4 miles (277.5 km). It is the trunk that connects the New York metropolitan area to Atlantic City and is consistently one of the safest roads in the nation. With a total of 15 travel and 6 shoulder lanes, the Driscoll Bridge on the Parkway, spanning the Raritan River in Middlesex County, is the widest motor vehicle bridge in the world by number of lanes as well as one of the busiest.

New Jersey is connected to New York City via various bridges and tunnels. The double-decked George Washington Bridge carries the heaviest load of motor vehicle traffic of any bridge in the world, at 102 million vehicles per year, over fourteen lanes, from Fort Lee, New Jersey in Bergen County across the Hudson River to the Trans-Manhattan Expressway in the Washington Heights neighborhood of Upper Manhattan in New York City; Interstate 95 and U.S. Route 1/9 cross the Hudson River via the "GWB", while U.S. Route 46, which lies entirely within New Jersey, ends halfway across the bridge at the state border with New York. The Lincoln Tunnel connects to Midtown Manhattan carrying New Jersey State Route 495 and the Holland Tunnel connects to Lower Manhattan carrying I-78. These are the three major Hudson River crossings that see heavy vehicular traffic. New Jersey is also connected to Staten Island by three bridges - from south to north: the Outerbridge Crossing, Goethals Bridge, and Bayonne Bridge.

Other expressways in New Jersey include the Atlantic City Expressway, the Palisades Interstate Parkway, Interstate 76, Interstate 78, Interstate 80, Interstate 95, Interstate 195, Interstate 278, Interstate 280, Interstate 287, Interstate 295, and Interstate 676. Other major roadways include U.S. 1, New Jersey Route 4, U.S. 9, New Jersey Route 10, and New Jersey Route 17.

New Jersey has interstate compacts with all three neighboring states. The Port Authority of New York and New Jersey, the Delaware River Port Authority (with Pennsylvania), and the Delaware River and Bay Authority (with Delaware) operate most of the major transportation routes into and out of New Jersey. Bridge tolls are collected in one direction only – it is free to cross into New Jersey, but motorists must pay when exiting the state. Exceptions to this are the Dingman's Ferry Bridge and the Delaware River – Turnpike Toll Bridge where tolls are charged both ways. The Washington Crossing and Scudders Falls (on I-95) bridges near Trenton, as well as Trenton's Calhoun Street and Bridge Street ("Trenton Makes") bridges, are toll-free. In addition, * Riverton-Belvidere Bridge, Northampton Street Bridge, Riegelsville Bridge, and Upper Black Eddy-Milford Bridge are free Delaware River bridges into and out of NJ.

  • Uhlerstown-Frenchtown Bridge – (NJ 12)
  • Lumberville-Raven Rock Bridge – (pedestrian)
  • Centre Bridge-Stockton Bridge – (PA 263 / CR 523)

New Jersey is one of only two states (along with Oregon) where all fuel dispensing stations are required to sell gasoline full-service to customers. It is unlawful for a customer to serve himself/herself.

Airports

Newark Liberty International Airport is one of the busiest airports in the United States. Operated by the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey, which runs the other two major airports in the New York metropolitan area (John F. Kennedy International Airport and LaGuardia Airport), it is one of the main airports serving the New York City area. United Airlines is the facility's largest tenant, operating an entire terminal at Newark, which it uses as one of its primary hubs. FedEx Express operates a large cargo hub. The adjacent Newark Airport railroad station provides access to the trains of Amtrak and New Jersey Transit along the Northeast Corridor Line.

Two smaller commercial airports, Atlantic City International Airport and Trenton-Mercer Airport, also operate in other parts of New Jersey. Teterboro Airport, in Bergen County, is a general aviation airport popular with private and corporate aircraft, due to its proximity to New York City. Millville Municipal Airport, in Cumberland County, is a general aviation airport popular with private and corporate aircraft, due to its proximity to the shore.

Rail and bus

The New Jersey Transit Corporation (NJ Transit) operates extensive rail and bus service throughout the state. NJ Transit is a state-run corporation that began with the consolidation of several private bus companies in North Jersey. In the early 1980s, it acquired the commuter train operations of Conrail that connect towns in northern and central New Jersey to New York City. NJ Transit has eleven lines that run throughout different parts of the state. Most of the trains start at various points in the state and most end at either Pennsylvania Station, in New York City, or Hoboken Terminal in Hoboken. NJ Transit began service between Atlantic City and Lindenwold in 1989 and extended it to Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, in the 1990s.

NJ Transit also operates three light rail systems in the state. The Hudson-Bergen Light Rail connects Bayonne to North Bergen, with planned expansion into Bergen County communities. The Newark Light Rail is the only subway system entirely in the state, but it is only partially underground. Its Main Line connects Newark Penn Station in Downtown Newark with outer parts of the city, ending at Grove Street station in Bloomfield. The Broad Street Line of the subway, the first component of the Newark-Elizabeth Rail Link, connects Newark Broad Street Station to Newark Penn Station. The last of the three light rail lines is the River Line which connects Trenton and Camden.

The PATH is a subway and above-ground railway which links Hoboken, Jersey City, Harrison and Newark with New York City. The PATH operates four lines that connect various points in North Jersey and New York. The lines all terminate in Hudson County, Essex County or Manhattan in New York City.

The PATCO High Speedline links Camden County and Philadelphia. PATCO operates a single elevated and subway line that runs from Lindenwold to Center City Philadelphia. PATCO operates stations in Lindenwold, Voorhees, Cherry Hill, Haddonfield, Haddon Township, Collingswood, and Camden, along with four stations in Philadelphia.

Amtrak also operates numerous long-distance passenger trains in New Jersey to and from neighboring states and around the country. In addition to the Newark Airport connection, other major Amtrak railway stations include Trenton Rail Station, Metropark, and the grand historic Newark Penn Station.

SEPTA also has two lines that operate into New Jersey. The Trenton Line terminates at the Trenton Transit Center, and the West Trenton Line terminates at the West Trenton Rail Station in Ewing.

AirTrain Newark is a monorail connecting the Amtrak/NJ Transit station on the Northeast Corridor to the airport's terminals and parking lots.

Some private bus carriers still remain in New Jersey. Most of these carriers operate with state funding to offset losses and state owned buses are provided to these carriers of which Coach USA companies make up the bulk. Other carriers include private charter and tour bus operators that take gamblers from other parts of New Jersey, New York City, Philadelphia, and Delaware to the casino resorts of Atlantic City.

Ferries

On the Delaware Bay, the Delaware River and Bay Authority operates the Cape May-Lewes Ferry. The agency also operates ferries between Fort Mott (New Jersey) and Fort Delaware and Fort DuPont in Delaware. The Delaware River Port Authority operates the RiverLink Ferry between the Camden waterfront and Penn's Landing in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

In the Port of New York and New Jersey, New York Waterway has ferry terminals at Belford Harbor, Jersey City, Hoboken and Weehawken, and Edgewater Landing. There are slips at Port Liberte, Liberty Harbor, Exchange Place in Jersey City, Port Imperial and Lincoln Harbor in Weehawken, Hoboken Terminal and 14th Street in Hoboken. Manhattan terminals are located at Wall Street/Pier 11, Battery Park City (BPC) or West Midtown Ferry Terminal. Liberty Water Taxi in Jersey City has ferries from Paulus Hook and Liberty State Park to (BPC). Statue Cruises has service from Liberty State Park and Statue of Liberty National Monument, including Ellis Island. (Although there is a bridge from Ellis Island to the park built for renovations on the island it is not open for public use.) SeaStreak offers services from the Raritan Bayshore to Manhattan and during the Met's season to Shea Stadium. The ferries on leave from Atlantic Highlands and two terminals in Highlands. Ferry service from Keyport and Perth Amboy have been also been proposed. Service from Elizabeth at Newark Bay is proposed in conjunction with re-development plans on the shore near Jersey Gardens.

Private bus carriers

Several private bus lines provide transportation service in the state of New Jersey. Below is a list of major carriers and their areas of operation:

  • Academy – commuter bus service from Burlington, Middlesex, Monmouth, and Ocean counties to lower and midtown Manhattan
  • Broadway Bus – local bus service in Bayonne
  • Coach USA
    • Community Coach – commuter bus service from Essex and Morris counties
    • ONE Bus/Olympia Trails – local bus service in Essex and Union counties, commuter bus service from the Raritan Valley to Manhattan
    • Red & Tan in Hudson County – local bus service in Hudson County
    • Rockland Coaches – commuter and local bus service from Bergen County to Manhattan
    • Suburban Trails – commuter bus service from Middlesex County to Manhattan, local bus service in Middlesex County
  • DeCamp Bus Lines – commuter bus service from Essex County to Manhattan
  • Greyhound – interstate bus service from terminals in Newark, Atlantic City, and Mount Laurel
  • Lakeland Bus Lines – commuter and local bus service from Morris, Somerset, Union, and Sussex counties to Manhattan
  • Martz Trailways – service from Warren County to Manhattan
  • Montgomery & West Side IBOA—local bus service in Jersey City
  • Trans-Bridge Lines – service from the Skylands Region to and from Manhattan

Governance

Executive

The position of Governor of New Jersey has been considered one of the most powerful in the nation. Until 2010 the governor was the only statewide elected office in the state appointed numerous government officials. Formerly, an Acting Governor was even more powerful as he simultaneously served as President of the New Jersey State Senate, thus directing half of the legislative and all of the executive process. In 2002 and 2007, President of the State Senate Richard Codey held the position of Acting Governor for a short time, and from 2004 to 2006 Codey became a long-term Acting Governor due to Jim McGreevey's resignation. A 2005 amendment to the state Constitution prevents the Senate President from becoming Acting Governor in the event of a permanent gubernatorial vacancy without giving up her or his seat in the state Senate. Chris Christie (Republican) is the Governor.

The governor's mansion is Drumthwacket, located in Princeton.

Before 2010, New Jersey was one of the few states without a lieutenant governor. Republican Kim Guadagno was elected the first Lieutenant Governor of New Jersey and took office on January 19, 2010. She was elected on the Republican ticket with Governor-Elect Chris Christie in the November 2009 NJ gubernatorial election. The position was created as the result of a Constitutional amendment to the New Jersey State Constitution passed by the voters on November 8, 2005 and effective as of January 17, 2006.

Legislative

The current version of the New Jersey State Constitution was adopted in 1947. It provides for a bicameral New Jersey Legislature, consisting of an upper house Senate of 40 members and a lower house General Assembly of 80 members. Each of the 40 legislative districts elects one State Senator and two Assembly members. Assembly members are elected for a two-year term in all odd-numbered years; State Senators are elected in the years ending in 1, 3, and 7 and thus serve either four- or two-year terms.

New Jersey is one of only five states that elects its state officials in odd-numbered years. (The others are Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, and Virginia.) New Jersey holds elections for these offices every four years, in the year following each federal Presidential election year. Thus, the last year when New Jersey elected a Governor was 2013; the next gubernatorial election will occur in 2017, with future gubernatorial elections to take place in 2021, 2025, 2029, etc.

Judicial

The New Jersey Supreme Court consists of a Chief Justice and six Associate Justices. All are appointed by the Governor with the advice and consent of a majority of the membership of the State Senate. Justices serve an initial seven-year term, after which they can be reappointed to serve until age 70.

Most of the day-to-day work in the New Jersey courts is carried out in the Municipal Courts, where simple traffic tickets, minor criminal offenses, and small civil matters are heard.

More serious criminal and civil cases are handled by the Superior Court for each county. All Superior Court judges are appointed by the Governor with the advice and consent of a majority of the membership of the State Senate. Each judge serves an initial seven-year term, after which he or she can be reappointed to serve until age 70.

New Jersey's judiciary is unusual in that it still has separate courts of law and equity, like its neighbor Delaware but unlike most other U.S. states. The New Jersey Superior Court is divided into Law and Chancery Divisions at the trial level.

The Superior Court also has an Appellate Division, which functions as the state's intermediate appellate court. Superior Court judges are assigned to the Appellate Division by the Chief Justice.

There is also a Tax Court, which is a court of limited jurisdiction. Tax Court judges hear appeals of tax decisions made by County Boards of Taxation. They also hear appeals on decisions made by the Director of the Division of Taxation on such matters as state income, sales and business taxes, and homestead rebates. Appeals from Tax Court decisions are heard in the Appellate Division of Superior Court. Tax Court judges are appointed by the Governor for initial terms of seven years, and upon reappointment are granted tenure until they reach the mandatory retirement age of 70. There are 12 Tax Court judgeships.

Counties

New Jersey is divided into 21 counties; 13 date from the colonial era. New Jersey was completely divided into counties by 1692; the present counties were created by dividing the existing ones; most recently Union County in 1857. New Jersey is the only state in the nation where elected county officials are called "Freeholders," governing each county as part of its own Board of Chosen Freeholders. The number of freeholders in each county is determined by referendum, and must consist of three, five, seven or nine members.

Depending on the county, the executive and legislative functions may be performed by the Board of Chosen Freeholders or split into separate branches of government. In 16 counties, members of the Board of Chosen Freeholders perform both legislative and executive functions on a commission basis, with each Freeholder assigned responsibility for a department or group of departments. In the other 5 counties (Atlantic, Bergen, Essex, Hudson and Mercer), there is a directly elected County Executive who performs the executive functions while the Board of Chosen Freeholders retains a legislative and oversight role. In counties without an Executive, a County Administrator (or County Manager) may be hired to perform day-to-day administration of county functions.

Municipalities

New Jersey has 565 municipalities; the number was 566 before Princeton Township and Princeton Borough merged to form the municipality of Princeton on January 1, 2013. Unlike states in the west and south, all New Jersey land is part of a municipality. In 2008, Governor Jon Corzine proposed cutting state aid to all towns under 10,000 people, to encourage mergers to reduce administrative costs. In May 2009, the Local Unit Alignment Reorganization and Consolidation Commission (LUARC) began a study of about 40 small communities in South Jersey to decide which ones might be good candidates for consolidation.

Types of government

When the types of government were devised in the 19th century, the intention was that cities would be large built-up areas, with progressively smaller boroughs, towns, and villages; the rural areas in between would be relatively large townships. This is still often true, although Shrewsbury Township has been divided over the years; today it is less than a square mile, consisting only of a single housing development. Some townships – notably Brick, Hamilton, Middletown, and Toms River – have, without changing their boundaries, become large stretches of suburbia, as populous as cities, often focused around shopping centers and highways rather than traditional downtowns and main streets.

Short Hills, Murray Hill, and many other locations in New Jersey are not municipalities but rather neighborhoods, with no exact boundaries. Often the cluster of houses, the traditional neighborhood, the postal district, and the census-designated place will differ.

Forms of government

The five types of municipality differ mostly in name. Originally, each type had its own form of government but more modern forms are available to any municipality, even though the original type is retained in its formal name. Only boroughs can (but are not required to) have the "borough form" of government.

Starting in the 20th century, largely driven by reform-minded goals, a series of six modern forms of government was implemented. This began with the Walsh Act, enacted in 1911 by the New Jersey Legislature, which provided for a 3- or 5-member commission elected on a non-partisan basis. This was followed by the 1923 Municipal Manager Law, which offered a non-partisan council, provided for a weak mayor elected by and from the members of the council, and introduced a Council-Manager government structure with an appointed manager responsible for day-to-day administration of municipal affairs.

The Faulkner Act, originally enacted in 1950 and substantially amended in 1981, offers four basic plans: Mayor-Council, Council-Manager, Small Municipality, and Mayor-Council-Administrator. The act provides many choices for communities with a preference for a strong executive and professional management of municipal affairs and offers great flexibility in allowing municipalities to select the characteristics of its government: the number of seats on the Council; seats selected at-large, by wards, or through a combination of both; staggered or concurrent terms of office; and a mayor chosen by the Council or elected directly by voters. Most large municipalities and a majority of New Jersey's residents are governed by municipalities with Faulkner Act charters. Municipalities can also formulate their own unique form of government and operate under a Special Charter with the approval of the New Jersey Legislature.

While municipalities retain their names derived from types of government, they may have changed to one of the modern forms of government, or further in the past to one of the other traditional forms, leading to municipalities with formal names quite baffling to the general public. For example, though there are four municipalities that are officially of the village type, Loch Arbour is the only one remaining with the village form of government. The other three villages – Ridgefield Park (now with a Walsh Act form), Ridgewood (now with a Faulkner Act Council-Manager charter) and South Orange (now operates under a Special Charter) – have all migrated to other non-village forms.

Politics

Social attitudes and issues

Socially, New Jersey is considered one of the more liberal states in the nation. Polls indicate that 60% of the population are self-described as pro-choice, although a majority are opposed to late trimester and Partial Birth Abortion and public funding of Abortion. In a 2009 Quinnipiac University Polling Institute poll, a plurality supported same-sex marriage 49% to 43% opposed, while the proportion supporting gay marriage continued to increase thereafter. On October 18, 2013, the New Jersey Supreme Court rendered a provisional, unanimous (7-0 vote) order authorizing same-sex marriage in the state, pending a legal appeal by Governor Chris Christie, who then withdrew this appeal hours after the inaugural same-sex marriages took place on October 21, 2013.

New Jersey also has some of the most stringent gun control laws in the U.S. These include bans on assault firearms, hollow-nose bullets and even slingshots. No gun offense in New Jersey is graded less than a felony. BB guns and black-powder guns are all treated as modern firearms. New Jersey does not recognize out-of-state gun licenses and aggressively enforces its own gun laws.

Elections

In past elections, New Jersey was a Republican bastion, but recently has become a Democratic stronghold. Currently, New Jersey Democrats have majority control of both houses of the New Jersey Legislature (Senate, 24–16, and Assembly, 47–33), a 6-6 split of the state's twelve seats in the U.S. House of Representatives, and both U.S. Senate seats. Although the Democratic Party is very successful statewide, the state had a Republican governor from 1994 to 2002, as Christie Todd Whitman won twice with 47% and 49% of the votes, and in the 2009 gubernatorial election, Republican Chris Christie defeated incumbent Democrat Jon Corzine with 48%. In the 2013 gubernatorial election, Christie won reelection with over 60% of the votes. Because each candidate for lieutenant governor runs on the same ticket as the party's candidate for governor, the current Governor and Lieutenant Governor are members of the Republican Party. The governor's appointments to cabinet and non-cabinet positions may be from either party; for instance, the Attorney General is a Democrat.

In federal elections, the state leans heavily towards the Democratic Party. For many years in the past, however, it was a Republican stronghold, having given comfortable margins of victory to the Republican candidate in the close elections of 1948, 1968, and 1976. New Jersey was a crucial swing state in the elections of 1960, 1968, and 1992. The last elected Republican to hold a Senate seat from New Jersey was Clifford P. Case in 1979. Newark Mayor Cory Booker was elected in October 2013 to join Robert Menendez to make New Jersey the first state with concurrent serving black and Latino U.S. senators.

The state's Democratic strongholds include Camden County, Essex County (including Newark, the state's largest city), Hudson County (including Jersey City, the state's second-largest city); Mercer County (especially around Trenton and Princeton), Middlesex County, and Union County (including Elizabeth, the state's fourth-largest city).

The suburban northwestern and southeastern counties of the state are reliably Republican: Republicans have support along the coast in Ocean County and in the mountainous northwestern part of the state, especially Morris County, Sussex County, and Warren County. Other suburban counties, especially Bergen County and Burlington County had the majority of votes go to the Democratic Party. In the 2008 election, President Barack Obama won New Jersey with approximately fifty-seven percent of the vote, compared to McCain's forty-one percent. Independent candidate Ralph Nader garnered less than one percent of the vote.

About one-third of the state's counties are considered "swing" counties, but some go more one way than others. For example, Salem County, the same is true with Passaic County, with a highly populated Hispanic Democratic south (including Paterson, the state's third-largest city) and a rural, Republican north. Other "swing" counties like Monmouth County, Somerset County, and Cape May County tend to go Republican, as they also have population in conservative areas.

To be eligible to vote in a U.S. election, all New Jerseyans are required to start their residency in the state 30 days prior to an election and register 29 days prior.

Capital punishment

On December 17, 2007, Governor Jon Corzine signed into law a bill that would eliminate the death penalty in New Jersey. New Jersey is the first state to pass such legislation since Iowa and West Virginia eliminated executions in 1965. Corzine also signed a bill that would downgrade the Death Row prisoners' sentences from "Death" to "Life in Prison with No Parole."

Points of interest

Museums

New Jersey has many museums of all kinds. A few major museums in the state are listed.

Entertainment and concert venues

Visitors and residents take advantage of and contribute to performances at the numerous music, theater, and dance companies and venues located throughout the state, including:

Theme parks

Jersey Shore

Sports

Professional sports

New Jersey currently has four teams from major professional sports leagues playing in the state, although the Major League Soccer team and two National Football League teams identify themselves as being from New York.

The National Hockey League's New Jersey Devils, based in Newark at the Prudential Center, is the only major league franchise to bear the state's name. The Metropolitan Area's two National Football League teams, the New York Giants and the New York Jets, both play in East Rutherford, Bergen County, at MetLife Stadium. At completion, with a construction cost of approximately $1.6 billion, the venue is the most expensive stadium ever built. On February 2, 2014, MetLife Stadium hosted Super Bowl XLVIII, the first Super Bowl played outdoors in a cold-weather city.

The New York Red Bulls of Major League Soccer play in Red Bull Arena, a soccer-specific stadium located in Harrison outside of downtown Newark.

The sports complex is also home to the Meadowlands Racetrack, one of three major harness racing tracks in the state. The Meadowlands Racetrack along with Freehold Raceway in Freehold are two of the major harness racing tracks in North America. Monmouth Park Racetrack in Oceanport is also a popular spot for thoroughbred racing in New Jersey and the northeast. It hosted the Breeders' Cup in 2007, and its turf course was renovated in preparation.

Additionally, New Jersey is home to two MLB affiliated Minor League Baseball teams: the Trenton Thunder (New York Yankees affiliate) and the Lakewood BlueClaws (Philadelphia Phillies affiliate).

The following table shows the major league sports teams in the state:

College sports

New Jerseyans' collegiate allegiances are predominately split among the three major NCAA Division I programs in the state – the Rutgers University Scarlet Knights, the Seton Hall University Pirates, and the Princeton University Tigers. Rutgers are joining the Big Ten Conference in 2014.

Rutgers and Princeton have an intense rivalry – stemming from the first intercollegiate football game in 1869 – though the two schools have not met on the football field since 1980. They continue to play each other annually in other sports.

Rutgers, which fields 24 teams in various sports, is nationally known for its excellent football and women's basketball programs. The university is planning an expansion to Rutgers Stadium, and the teams play in Piscataway, which is adjacent to the New Brunswick campus. The university also fields rising basketball and baseball programs. Rutgers' fan base is mostly derived from the western parts of the state and Middlesex County, and its alumni base is the largest in the state.

Seton Hall's basketball team has been one of the most storied programs in the Big East, and it plays its home games at the Prudential Center in Newark. The Pirates have support in the predominately Roman Catholic areas of the northern part of the state and the Jersey Shore.

High-school sports

New Jersey high schools are divided into divisions under the New Jersey State Interscholastic Athletic Association.(NJSIAA) ' Founded in 1918, the NJSIAA currently represents 22,000 schools, 330,000 coaches, and almost 4.5 million athletes. Sports are divided between 3 seasons (fall, winter, and spring).

Culture

General

Like every state, New Jersey has its own cuisine, religious communities, museums, and halls of fame.

New Jersey is the birthplace of modern inventions such as: FM radio, the motion picture camera, the lithium battery, the light bulb, transistors, and the electric train. Other New Jersey creations include: the drive-in movie, the cultivated blueberry, cranberry sauce, the postcard, the boardwalk, the zipper, the phonograph, saltwater taffy, the dirigible, the seedless watermelon, the first use of a submarine in warfare, and the ice cream cone.

There are mineral museums in Franklin and Ogdensburg.

Diners are common in New Jersey. The state is home to many diner manufacturers and has more diners than any other state: over 600. There are more diners in the state of New Jersey than any other place in the world.

New Jersey is the only state without a state song. "I'm From New Jersey" is incorrectly listed on many websites as being the New Jersey State Song, but wasn't even a contender when in 1996 the New Jersey Arts Council submitted their suggestions to the New Jersey Legislature.

Cuisine

New Jersey is known for several foods developed within the region, including pork roll (or Taylor ham), cheesesteaks, and scrapple.

Credit for the development of submarine sandwiches is claimed by several states with substantial Italian American populations, including New Jersey.

Music

New Jersey has long been an important area for both rock and rap music. Some prominent musicians from or with significant connections to New Jersey are:

  • Singer Frank Sinatra was born in Hoboken. He sang with a neighborhood vocal group, the Hoboken Four, and appeared in neighborhood theater amateur shows before he became an Academy Award–winning actor.
  • Bruce Springsteen, who has sung of New Jersey life on most of his albums, is from Freehold. Some of his songs that represent New Jersey life are "Born to Run", "Spirit In The Night," "Rosalita (Come Out Tonight)", "Thunder Road", "Atlantic City", and "Jungleland".
  • The Jonas Brothers all reside in Wyckoff, New Jersey, where the eldest and youngest brothers of the group, Kevin and Frankie Jonas, were born.
  • Irvington's Queen Latifah was the first female rapper to succeed in music, film, and television.
  • Lauryn Hill is from South Orange, New Jersey. Her 1998 debut solo album, The Miseducation of Lauryn Hill, sold 10 million copies internationally. She also sold millions with The Fugees second album The Score.
  • Southside Johnny, eponymous leader of Southside Johnny and the Asbury Jukes was raised in Ocean Grove. He is considered the "Grandfather of the New Jersey Sound" and is cited by Jersey-born Jon Bon Jovi as his reason for singing.
  • Redman (Reggie Noble) was born, raised, and resides in Newark. He is the most successful African-American solo hip-hop artist out of New Jersey.
  • All members of The Sugarhill Gang were born in Englewood.
  • Roc-A-Fella Records rap producer Just Blaze is from Paterson, New Jersey.
  • Jon Bon Jovi, from Sayreville, reached fame in the 1980s with hard rock outfit Bon Jovi. The band has also written many songs about life in New Jersey including "Livin' On A Prayer" and named one of their albums after the state. (see New Jersey)
  • Singer Dionne Warwick was born in East Orange.
  • Singer Whitney Houston (who is Dionne Warwick's cousin) was born in Newark, and grew up in neighboring East Orange.
  • Jazz pianist and bandleader Count Basie was born in Red Bank in 1904. In the 1960s, he collaborated on several albums with fellow New Jersey native Frank Sinatra. The Count Basie Theatre in Red Bank is named in his honor.
  • Parliament-Funkadelic, the funk music collective, was formed in Plainfield by George Clinton.
  • Asbury Park is home of The Stone Pony, which Bruce Springsteen and Bon Jovi frequented early in their careers
  • Hip-hop pioneers Naughty By Nature are from East Orange.
  • In 1964, the Isley Brothers founded the record label T-Neck Records, named after Teaneck, their home at the time.
  • The Broadway musical "Jersey Boys" is based on the lives of the members of the Four Seasons, three of whose members were born in New Jersey (Tommy DeVito, Frankie Valli, and Nick Massi) while a fourth Bob Gaudio was born out of state but raised in Bergenfield, NJ.
  • Jazz pianist Bill Evans was born in Plainfield in 1929.
  • Post-hardcore band Thursday was formed in New Brunswick, New Jersey. Numerous songs reference the city.
  • Horror punk band The Misfits hail from Lodi, as well as their founder Glenn Danzig.
  • Punk rock poet Patti Smith is from Mantua.
  • Indie rock veterans Yo La Tengo are based in Hoboken. They also have a song called "The Night Falls on Hoboken".
  • New Jersey was the East Coast hub for ska music in the 1990s. Some of the most popular ska bands, such as Catch 22 and Streetlight Manifesto, come from East Brunswick.
  • Black Label Society's and Ozzy Osbourne's famed guitarist Zakk Wylde was born in Bayonne and raised in Jackson
  • The Bouncing Souls original four members grew up in Basking Ridge and formed in New Brunswick in the late 1980s.
  • My Chemical Romance's Frank Iero, Gerard Way, Mikey Way, and Ray Toro all are from New Jersey.
  • Cobra Starship frontman Gabe Saporta is from New Jersey
  • Punk band The Gaslight Anthem hails from New Brunswick, New Jersey.
  • Experimental metal band The Dillinger Escape Plan are from Morris Plains, NJ.
  • Debbie Harry, born in Miami, Florida, in 1945 but raised by her adoptive parents in Hawthorne.

Comics and video games

  • The Lost and Damned (2009), The Ballad of Gay Tony and Max Payne 3 (2012) take place in New Jersey.
  • The Grand Theft Auto series has parodied the state multiple times, with "New Guernsey" and "Alderney City" appearing as locations in games in the series.
  • Some incarnations of DC Comics's fictional Gotham City are located in New Jersey.

State symbols


Notable people

See also

  • Outline of New Jersey – organized list of topics about New Jersey
  • Index of New Jersey-related articles


References

External links

State Government

  • Official New Jersey state web site
  • New Jersey State Databases – Annotated list of searchable databases produced by New Jersey state agencies and compiled by the Government Documents Roundtable of the American Library Association.
  • Descriptions of NJ forms of government (e.g., township, borough, etc.) from NJ State League of Municipalities

U.S. Government

  • Energy Data & Statistics for New Jersey
  • USGS real-time, geographic, and other scientific resources of New Jersey
  • US Census Bureau
  • USDA New Jersey State Facts

Other

  • New Jersey at DMOZ
  • The New Jersey Digital Highway, the statewide cultural heritage portal to digital collections from the state's archives, libraries and museums
  • Abandoned and Historic Mines of New Jersey
  • New Jersey Stage - arts & entertainment news throughout the state
  • Blow Up Radio -- all NJ online radio station
  • Geographic data related to New Jersey at OpenStreetMap

Comments

avatar 12
Caller Type: Unknown
posted by Guest in Phone Number 2019-04-11 14:49:29

You suck

avatar 12
Caller Type: Unknown
posted by Guest in Phone Number 2019-04-11 14:48:12

Who is it

avatar 12
Caller Type: Text Message
posted by Guest in Phone Number 2019-04-11 12:25:57

what up girl

avatar 12
Caller Type: Harrassing Call
posted by Guest in Phone Number 2019-04-11 08:50:03

don't know number, no ID, called 8 times in 3 minutes

avatar 12
Caller Type: Unknown
posted by Guest in Phone Number 2019-04-11 07:55:34

I keep getting calls and all they do is swear at and wont hang up the connection

avatar 12
Caller Type: Text Message
posted by Guest in Phone Number 2019-04-10 18:26:03

they just sent me a text message and asked for a copy of my Drivers license saying they are from a tax office

avatar 12
Caller Type: Telemarketer
posted by Guest in Phone Number 2019-04-10 15:07:16

Spanish speaker only. Three missed calls on my phone. Could not explain why I was called

avatar 12
Caller Type: Text Message
posted by Guest in Phone Number 2019-04-10 10:17:33

Won't stop texting me

avatar 12
Caller Type: Unknown
posted by Guest in Phone Number 2019-04-10 02:00:53

OK

avatar 12
Caller Type: Hung Up
posted by Guest in Phone Number 2019-04-09 20:03:10

sz arizona

avatar 12
Caller Type: Unknown
posted by Guest in Phone Number 2019-04-09 17:07:11

Been calling me 3 times a day and never talks and you can't call the number back . Put a block on it after today

avatar 12
Caller Type: Hung Up
posted by Guest in Phone Number 2019-04-09 12:21:56

Unknown

avatar 12
Caller Type: Unknown
posted by Guest in Phone Number 2019-04-09 08:53:27

"Hello there, I'm the doctor from Pennsylvania..... blah blah blah, erectile dysfunction...... blah blah blah....breakthrough treatment... blah blah blah. Give me a break ya fraud. Get a real job.

avatar 12
Caller Type: Unknown
posted by Guest in Phone Number 2019-04-09 08:53:03

Do not answer

avatar 12
Caller Type: Unknown
posted by Guest in Phone Number 2019-04-09 08:37:09

Just another unknown caller who left no message. Probably either a wrong number or a telemarketer. Joe

avatar 12
Caller Type: Unknown
posted by Guest in Phone Number 2019-04-09 08:14:46

What is this? All I want is the reverse lookup for a telephone number. Used to be able to get that info from the phone company back in the day, now everyone's trying to make a fast buck off of this.

avatar 12
Caller Type: Unknown
posted by Guest in Phone Number 2019-04-09 05:17:09

left no message

avatar 12
Caller Type: Unknown
posted by Guest in Phone Number 2019-04-08 21:07:06

kk

avatar 12
Caller Type: Helpful
posted by Guest in Phone Number 2019-04-08 17:56:29

great

avatar 12
Caller Type: Unknown
posted by Guest in Phone Number 2019-04-08 16:12:07

Speaking spanish & left voicemail

Search Phone Number

Your Comment

(1 + 8 = ? )

Similar phone numbers

7328461000 , 732-846-1000 7328461001 , 732-846-1001 7328461002 , 732-846-1002 7328461003 , 732-846-1003 7328461004 , 732-846-1004 7328461005 , 732-846-1005 7328461006 , 732-846-1006 7328461007 , 732-846-1007 7328461008 , 732-846-1008 7328461009 , 732-846-1009 7328461010 , 732-846-1010 7328461011 , 732-846-1011 7328461012 , 732-846-1012 7328461013 , 732-846-1013 7328461014 , 732-846-1014 7328461015 , 732-846-1015 7328461016 , 732-846-1016 7328461017 , 732-846-1017 7328461018 , 732-846-1018 7328461019 , 732-846-1019 7328461020 , 732-846-1020 7328461021 , 732-846-1021 7328461022 , 732-846-1022 7328461023 , 732-846-1023 7328461024 , 732-846-1024 7328461025 , 732-846-1025 7328461026 , 732-846-1026 7328461027 , 732-846-1027 7328461028 , 732-846-1028 7328461029 , 732-846-1029 7328461030 , 732-846-1030 7328461031 , 732-846-1031 7328461032 , 732-846-1032 7328461033 , 732-846-1033 7328461034 , 732-846-1034 7328461035 , 732-846-1035 7328461036 , 732-846-1036 7328461037 , 732-846-1037 7328461038 , 732-846-1038 7328461039 , 732-846-1039 7328461040 , 732-846-1040 7328461041 , 732-846-1041 7328461042 , 732-846-1042 7328461043 , 732-846-1043 7328461044 , 732-846-1044 7328461045 , 732-846-1045 7328461046 , 732-846-1046 7328461047 , 732-846-1047 7328461048 , 732-846-1048 7328461049 , 732-846-1049 7328461050 , 732-846-1050 7328461051 , 732-846-1051 7328461052 , 732-846-1052 7328461053 , 732-846-1053 7328461054 , 732-846-1054 7328461055 , 732-846-1055 7328461056 , 732-846-1056 7328461057 , 732-846-1057 7328461058 , 732-846-1058 7328461059 , 732-846-1059 7328461060 , 732-846-1060 7328461061 , 732-846-1061 7328461062 , 732-846-1062 7328461063 , 732-846-1063 7328461064 , 732-846-1064 7328461065 , 732-846-1065 7328461066 , 732-846-1066 7328461067 , 732-846-1067 7328461068 , 732-846-1068 7328461069 , 732-846-1069 7328461070 , 732-846-1070 7328461071 , 732-846-1071 7328461072 , 732-846-1072 7328461073 , 732-846-1073 7328461074 , 732-846-1074 7328461075 , 732-846-1075 7328461076 , 732-846-1076 7328461077 , 732-846-1077 7328461078 , 732-846-1078 7328461079 , 732-846-1079 7328461080 , 732-846-1080 7328461081 , 732-846-1081 7328461082 , 732-846-1082 7328461083 , 732-846-1083 7328461084 , 732-846-1084 7328461085 , 732-846-1085 7328461086 , 732-846-1086 7328461087 , 732-846-1087 7328461088 , 732-846-1088 7328461089 , 732-846-1089 7328461090 , 732-846-1090 7328461091 , 732-846-1091 7328461092 , 732-846-1092 7328461093 , 732-846-1093 7328461094 , 732-846-1094 7328461095 , 732-846-1095 7328461096 , 732-846-1096 7328461097 , 732-846-1097 7328461098 , 732-846-1098 7328461099 , 732-846-1099 7328461100 , 732-846-1100 7328461101 , 732-846-1101 7328461102 , 732-846-1102 7328461103 , 732-846-1103 7328461104 , 732-846-1104 7328461105 , 732-846-1105 7328461106 , 732-846-1106 7328461107 , 732-846-1107 7328461108 , 732-846-1108 7328461109 , 732-846-1109 7328461110 , 732-846-1110 7328461111 , 732-846-1111 7328461112 , 732-846-1112 7328461113 , 732-846-1113 7328461114 , 732-846-1114 7328461115 , 732-846-1115 7328461116 , 732-846-1116 7328461117 , 732-846-1117 7328461118 , 732-846-1118 7328461119 , 732-846-1119 7328461120 , 732-846-1120 7328461121 , 732-846-1121 7328461122 , 732-846-1122 7328461123 , 732-846-1123 7328461124 , 732-846-1124 7328461125 , 732-846-1125 7328461126 , 732-846-1126 7328461127 , 732-846-1127 7328461128 , 732-846-1128 7328461129 , 732-846-1129 7328461130 , 732-846-1130 7328461131 , 732-846-1131 7328461132 , 732-846-1132 7328461133 , 732-846-1133 7328461134 , 732-846-1134 7328461135 , 732-846-1135 7328461136 , 732-846-1136 7328461137 , 732-846-1137 7328461138 , 732-846-1138 7328461139 , 732-846-1139 7328461140 , 732-846-1140 7328461141 , 732-846-1141 7328461142 , 732-846-1142 7328461143 , 732-846-1143 7328461144 , 732-846-1144 7328461145 , 732-846-1145 7328461146 , 732-846-1146 7328461147 , 732-846-1147 7328461148 , 732-846-1148 7328461149 , 732-846-1149 7328461150 , 732-846-1150 7328461151 , 732-846-1151 7328461152 , 732-846-1152 7328461153 , 732-846-1153 7328461154 , 732-846-1154 7328461155 , 732-846-1155 7328461156 , 732-846-1156 7328461157 , 732-846-1157 7328461158 , 732-846-1158 7328461159 , 732-846-1159 7328461160 , 732-846-1160 7328461161 , 732-846-1161 7328461162 , 732-846-1162 7328461163 , 732-846-1163 7328461164 , 732-846-1164 7328461165 , 732-846-1165 7328461166 , 732-846-1166 7328461167 , 732-846-1167 7328461168 , 732-846-1168 7328461169 , 732-846-1169 7328461170 , 732-846-1170 7328461171 , 732-846-1171 7328461172 , 732-846-1172 7328461173 , 732-846-1173 7328461174 , 732-846-1174 7328461175 , 732-846-1175 7328461176 , 732-846-1176 7328461177 , 732-846-1177 7328461178 , 732-846-1178 7328461179 , 732-846-1179 7328461180 , 732-846-1180 7328461181 , 732-846-1181 7328461182 , 732-846-1182 7328461183 , 732-846-1183 7328461184 , 732-846-1184 7328461185 , 732-846-1185 7328461186 , 732-846-1186 7328461187 , 732-846-1187 7328461188 , 732-846-1188 7328461189 , 732-846-1189 7328461190 , 732-846-1190 7328461191 , 732-846-1191 7328461192 , 732-846-1192 7328461193 , 732-846-1193 7328461194 , 732-846-1194 7328461195 , 732-846-1195 7328461196 , 732-846-1196 7328461197 , 732-846-1197 7328461198 , 732-846-1198 7328461199 , 732-846-1199 7328461200 , 732-846-1200 7328461201 , 732-846-1201 7328461202 , 732-846-1202 7328461203 , 732-846-1203 7328461204 , 732-846-1204 7328461205 , 732-846-1205 7328461206 , 732-846-1206 7328461207 , 732-846-1207 7328461208 , 732-846-1208 7328461209 , 732-846-1209 7328461210 , 732-846-1210 7328461211 , 732-846-1211 7328461212 , 732-846-1212 7328461213 , 732-846-1213 7328461214 , 732-846-1214 7328461215 , 732-846-1215 7328461216 , 732-846-1216 7328461217 , 732-846-1217 7328461218 , 732-846-1218 7328461219 , 732-846-1219 7328461220 , 732-846-1220 7328461221 , 732-846-1221 7328461222 , 732-846-1222 7328461223 , 732-846-1223 7328461224 , 732-846-1224 7328461225 , 732-846-1225 7328461226 , 732-846-1226 7328461227 , 732-846-1227 7328461228 , 732-846-1228 7328461229 , 732-846-1229 7328461230 , 732-846-1230 7328461231 , 732-846-1231 7328461232 , 732-846-1232 7328461233 , 732-846-1233 7328461234 , 732-846-1234 7328461235 , 732-846-1235 7328461236 , 732-846-1236 7328461237 , 732-846-1237 7328461238 , 732-846-1238 7328461239 , 732-846-1239 7328461240 , 732-846-1240 7328461241 , 732-846-1241 7328461242 , 732-846-1242 7328461243 , 732-846-1243 7328461244 , 732-846-1244 7328461245 , 732-846-1245 7328461246 , 732-846-1246 7328461247 , 732-846-1247 7328461248 , 732-846-1248 7328461249 , 732-846-1249 7328461250 , 732-846-1250 7328461251 , 732-846-1251 7328461252 , 732-846-1252 7328461253 , 732-846-1253 7328461254 , 732-846-1254 7328461255 , 732-846-1255 7328461256 , 732-846-1256 7328461257 , 732-846-1257 7328461258 , 732-846-1258 7328461259 , 732-846-1259 7328461260 , 732-846-1260 7328461261 , 732-846-1261 7328461262 , 732-846-1262 7328461263 , 732-846-1263 7328461264 , 732-846-1264 7328461265 , 732-846-1265 7328461266 , 732-846-1266 7328461267 , 732-846-1267 7328461268 , 732-846-1268 7328461269 , 732-846-1269 7328461270 , 732-846-1270 7328461271 , 732-846-1271 7328461272 , 732-846-1272 7328461273 , 732-846-1273 7328461274 , 732-846-1274 7328461275 , 732-846-1275 7328461276 , 732-846-1276 7328461277 , 732-846-1277 7328461278 , 732-846-1278 7328461279 , 732-846-1279 7328461280 , 732-846-1280 7328461281 , 732-846-1281 7328461282 , 732-846-1282 7328461283 , 732-846-1283 7328461284 , 732-846-1284 7328461285 , 732-846-1285 7328461286 , 732-846-1286 7328461287 , 732-846-1287 7328461288 , 732-846-1288 7328461289 , 732-846-1289 7328461290 , 732-846-1290 7328461291 , 732-846-1291 7328461292 , 732-846-1292 7328461293 , 732-846-1293 7328461294 , 732-846-1294 7328461295 , 732-846-1295 7328461296 , 732-846-1296 7328461297 , 732-846-1297 7328461298 , 732-846-1298 7328461299 , 732-846-1299 7328461300 , 732-846-1300 7328461301 , 732-846-1301 7328461302 , 732-846-1302 7328461303 , 732-846-1303 7328461304 , 732-846-1304 7328461305 , 732-846-1305 7328461306 , 732-846-1306 7328461307 , 732-846-1307 7328461308 , 732-846-1308 7328461309 , 732-846-1309 7328461310 , 732-846-1310 7328461311 , 732-846-1311 7328461312 , 732-846-1312 7328461313 , 732-846-1313 7328461314 , 732-846-1314 7328461315 , 732-846-1315 7328461316 , 732-846-1316 7328461317 , 732-846-1317 7328461318 , 732-846-1318 7328461319 , 732-846-1319 7328461320 , 732-846-1320 7328461321 , 732-846-1321 7328461322 , 732-846-1322 7328461323 , 732-846-1323 7328461324 , 732-846-1324 7328461325 , 732-846-1325 7328461326 , 732-846-1326 7328461327 , 732-846-1327 7328461328 , 732-846-1328 7328461329 , 732-846-1329 7328461330 , 732-846-1330 7328461331 , 732-846-1331 7328461332 , 732-846-1332 7328461333 , 732-846-1333 7328461334 , 732-846-1334 7328461335 , 732-846-1335 7328461336 , 732-846-1336 7328461337 , 732-846-1337 7328461338 , 732-846-1338 7328461339 , 732-846-1339 7328461340 , 732-846-1340 7328461341 , 732-846-1341 7328461342 , 732-846-1342 7328461343 , 732-846-1343 7328461344 , 732-846-1344 7328461345 , 732-846-1345 7328461346 , 732-846-1346 7328461347 , 732-846-1347 7328461348 , 732-846-1348 7328461349 , 732-846-1349 7328461350 , 732-846-1350 7328461351 , 732-846-1351 7328461352 , 732-846-1352 7328461353 , 732-846-1353 7328461354 , 732-846-1354 7328461355 , 732-846-1355 7328461356 , 732-846-1356 7328461357 , 732-846-1357 7328461358 , 732-846-1358 7328461359 , 732-846-1359 7328461360 , 732-846-1360 7328461361 , 732-846-1361 7328461362 , 732-846-1362 7328461363 , 732-846-1363 7328461364 , 732-846-1364 7328461365 , 732-846-1365 7328461366 , 732-846-1366 7328461367 , 732-846-1367 7328461368 , 732-846-1368 7328461369 , 732-846-1369 7328461370 , 732-846-1370 7328461371 , 732-846-1371 7328461372 , 732-846-1372 7328461373 , 732-846-1373 7328461374 , 732-846-1374 7328461375 , 732-846-1375 7328461376 , 732-846-1376 7328461377 , 732-846-1377 7328461378 , 732-846-1378 7328461379 , 732-846-1379 7328461380 , 732-846-1380 7328461381 , 732-846-1381 7328461382 , 732-846-1382 7328461383 , 732-846-1383 7328461384 , 732-846-1384 7328461385 , 732-846-1385 7328461386 , 732-846-1386 7328461387 , 732-846-1387 7328461388 , 732-846-1388 7328461389 , 732-846-1389 7328461390 , 732-846-1390 7328461391 , 732-846-1391 7328461392 , 732-846-1392 7328461393 , 732-846-1393 7328461394 , 732-846-1394 7328461395 , 732-846-1395 7328461396 , 732-846-1396 7328461397 , 732-846-1397 7328461398 , 732-846-1398 7328461399 , 732-846-1399 7328461400 , 732-846-1400 7328461401 , 732-846-1401 7328461402 , 732-846-1402 7328461403 , 732-846-1403 7328461404 , 732-846-1404 7328461405 , 732-846-1405 7328461406 , 732-846-1406 7328461407 , 732-846-1407 7328461408 , 732-846-1408 7328461409 , 732-846-1409 7328461410 , 732-846-1410 7328461411 , 732-846-1411 7328461412 , 732-846-1412 7328461413 , 732-846-1413 7328461414 , 732-846-1414 7328461415 , 732-846-1415 7328461416 , 732-846-1416 7328461417 , 732-846-1417 7328461418 , 732-846-1418 7328461419 , 732-846-1419 7328461420 , 732-846-1420 7328461421 , 732-846-1421 7328461422 , 732-846-1422 7328461423 , 732-846-1423 7328461424 , 732-846-1424 7328461425 , 732-846-1425 7328461426 , 732-846-1426 7328461427 , 732-846-1427 7328461428 , 732-846-1428 7328461429 , 732-846-1429 7328461430 , 732-846-1430 7328461431 , 732-846-1431 7328461432 , 732-846-1432 7328461433 , 732-846-1433 7328461434 , 732-846-1434 7328461435 , 732-846-1435 7328461436 , 732-846-1436 7328461437 , 732-846-1437 7328461438 , 732-846-1438 7328461439 , 732-846-1439 7328461440 , 732-846-1440 7328461441 , 732-846-1441 7328461442 , 732-846-1442 7328461443 , 732-846-1443 7328461444 , 732-846-1444 7328461445 , 732-846-1445 7328461446 , 732-846-1446 7328461447 , 732-846-1447 7328461448 , 732-846-1448 7328461449 , 732-846-1449 7328461450 , 732-846-1450 7328461451 , 732-846-1451 7328461452 , 732-846-1452 7328461453 , 732-846-1453 7328461454 , 732-846-1454 7328461455 , 732-846-1455 7328461456 , 732-846-1456 7328461457 , 732-846-1457 7328461458 , 732-846-1458 7328461459 , 732-846-1459 7328461460 , 732-846-1460 7328461461 , 732-846-1461 7328461462 , 732-846-1462 7328461463 , 732-846-1463 7328461464 , 732-846-1464 7328461465 , 732-846-1465 7328461466 , 732-846-1466 7328461467 , 732-846-1467 7328461468 , 732-846-1468 7328461469 , 732-846-1469 7328461470 , 732-846-1470 7328461471 , 732-846-1471 7328461472 , 732-846-1472 7328461473 , 732-846-1473 7328461474 , 732-846-1474 7328461475 , 732-846-1475 7328461476 , 732-846-1476 7328461477 , 732-846-1477 7328461478 , 732-846-1478 7328461479 , 732-846-1479 7328461480 , 732-846-1480 7328461481 , 732-846-1481 7328461482 , 732-846-1482 7328461483 , 732-846-1483 7328461484 , 732-846-1484 7328461485 , 732-846-1485 7328461486 , 732-846-1486 7328461487 , 732-846-1487 7328461488 , 732-846-1488 7328461489 , 732-846-1489 7328461490 , 732-846-1490 7328461491 , 732-846-1491 7328461492 , 732-846-1492 7328461493 , 732-846-1493 7328461494 , 732-846-1494 7328461495 , 732-846-1495 7328461496 , 732-846-1496 7328461497 , 732-846-1497 7328461498 , 732-846-1498 7328461499 , 732-846-1499 7328461500 , 732-846-1500 7328461501 , 732-846-1501 7328461502 , 732-846-1502 7328461503 , 732-846-1503 7328461504 , 732-846-1504 7328461505 , 732-846-1505 7328461506 , 732-846-1506 7328461507 , 732-846-1507 7328461508 , 732-846-1508 7328461509 , 732-846-1509 7328461510 , 732-846-1510 7328461511 , 732-846-1511 7328461512 , 732-846-1512 7328461513 , 732-846-1513 7328461514 , 732-846-1514 7328461515 , 732-846-1515 7328461516 , 732-846-1516 7328461517 , 732-846-1517 7328461518 , 732-846-1518 7328461519 , 732-846-1519 7328461520 , 732-846-1520 7328461521 , 732-846-1521 7328461522 , 732-846-1522 7328461523 , 732-846-1523 7328461524 , 732-846-1524 7328461525 , 732-846-1525 7328461526 , 732-846-1526 7328461527 , 732-846-1527 7328461528 , 732-846-1528 7328461529 , 732-846-1529 7328461530 , 732-846-1530 7328461531 , 732-846-1531 7328461532 , 732-846-1532 7328461533 , 732-846-1533 7328461534 , 732-846-1534 7328461535 , 732-846-1535 7328461536 , 732-846-1536 7328461537 , 732-846-1537 7328461538 , 732-846-1538 7328461539 , 732-846-1539 7328461540 , 732-846-1540 7328461541 , 732-846-1541 7328461542 , 732-846-1542 7328461543 , 732-846-1543 7328461544 , 732-846-1544 7328461545 , 732-846-1545 7328461546 , 732-846-1546 7328461547 , 732-846-1547 7328461548 , 732-846-1548 7328461549 , 732-846-1549 7328461550 , 732-846-1550 7328461551 , 732-846-1551 7328461552 , 732-846-1552 7328461553 , 732-846-1553 7328461554 , 732-846-1554 7328461555 , 732-846-1555 7328461556 , 732-846-1556 7328461557 , 732-846-1557 7328461558 , 732-846-1558 7328461559 , 732-846-1559 7328461560 , 732-846-1560 7328461561 , 732-846-1561 7328461562 , 732-846-1562 7328461563 , 732-846-1563 7328461564 , 732-846-1564 7328461565 , 732-846-1565 7328461566 , 732-846-1566 7328461567 , 732-846-1567 7328461568 , 732-846-1568 7328461569 , 732-846-1569 7328461570 , 732-846-1570 7328461571 , 732-846-1571 7328461572 , 732-846-1572 7328461573 , 732-846-1573 7328461574 , 732-846-1574 7328461575 , 732-846-1575 7328461576 , 732-846-1576 7328461577 , 732-846-1577 7328461578 , 732-846-1578 7328461579 , 732-846-1579 7328461580 , 732-846-1580 7328461581 , 732-846-1581 7328461582 , 732-846-1582 7328461583 , 732-846-1583 7328461584 , 732-846-1584 7328461585 , 732-846-1585 7328461586 , 732-846-1586 7328461587 , 732-846-1587 7328461588 , 732-846-1588 7328461589 , 732-846-1589 7328461590 , 732-846-1590 7328461591 , 732-846-1591 7328461592 , 732-846-1592 7328461593 , 732-846-1593 7328461594 , 732-846-1594 7328461595 , 732-846-1595 7328461596 , 732-846-1596 7328461597 , 732-846-1597 7328461598 , 732-846-1598 7328461599 , 732-846-1599 7328461600 , 732-846-1600 7328461601 , 732-846-1601 7328461602 , 732-846-1602 7328461603 , 732-846-1603 7328461604 , 732-846-1604 7328461605 , 732-846-1605 7328461606 , 732-846-1606 7328461607 , 732-846-1607 7328461608 , 732-846-1608 7328461609 , 732-846-1609 7328461610 , 732-846-1610 7328461611 , 732-846-1611 7328461612 , 732-846-1612 7328461613 , 732-846-1613 7328461614 , 732-846-1614 7328461615 , 732-846-1615 7328461616 , 732-846-1616 7328461617 , 732-846-1617 7328461618 , 732-846-1618 7328461619 , 732-846-1619 7328461620 , 732-846-1620 7328461621 , 732-846-1621 7328461622 , 732-846-1622 7328461623 , 732-846-1623 7328461624 , 732-846-1624 7328461625 , 732-846-1625 7328461626 , 732-846-1626 7328461627 , 732-846-1627 7328461628 , 732-846-1628 7328461629 , 732-846-1629 7328461630 , 732-846-1630 7328461631 , 732-846-1631 7328461632 , 732-846-1632 7328461633 , 732-846-1633 7328461634 , 732-846-1634 7328461635 , 732-846-1635 7328461636 , 732-846-1636 7328461637 , 732-846-1637 7328461638 , 732-846-1638 7328461639 , 732-846-1639 7328461640 , 732-846-1640 7328461641 , 732-846-1641 7328461642 , 732-846-1642 7328461643 , 732-846-1643 7328461644 , 732-846-1644 7328461645 , 732-846-1645 7328461646 , 732-846-1646 7328461647 , 732-846-1647 7328461648 , 732-846-1648 7328461649 , 732-846-1649 7328461650 , 732-846-1650 7328461651 , 732-846-1651 7328461652 , 732-846-1652 7328461653 , 732-846-1653 7328461654 , 732-846-1654 7328461655 , 732-846-1655 7328461656 , 732-846-1656 7328461657 , 732-846-1657 7328461658 , 732-846-1658 7328461659 , 732-846-1659 7328461660 , 732-846-1660 7328461661 , 732-846-1661 7328461662 , 732-846-1662 7328461663 , 732-846-1663 7328461664 , 732-846-1664 7328461665 , 732-846-1665 7328461666 , 732-846-1666 7328461667 , 732-846-1667 7328461668 , 732-846-1668 7328461669 , 732-846-1669 7328461670 , 732-846-1670 7328461671 , 732-846-1671 7328461672 , 732-846-1672 7328461673 , 732-846-1673 7328461674 , 732-846-1674 7328461675 , 732-846-1675 7328461676 , 732-846-1676 7328461677 , 732-846-1677 7328461678 , 732-846-1678 7328461679 , 732-846-1679 7328461680 , 732-846-1680 7328461681 , 732-846-1681 7328461682 , 732-846-1682 7328461683 , 732-846-1683 7328461684 , 732-846-1684 7328461685 , 732-846-1685 7328461686 , 732-846-1686 7328461687 , 732-846-1687 7328461688 , 732-846-1688 7328461689 , 732-846-1689 7328461690 , 732-846-1690 7328461691 , 732-846-1691 7328461692 , 732-846-1692 7328461693 , 732-846-1693 7328461694 , 732-846-1694 7328461695 , 732-846-1695 7328461696 , 732-846-1696 7328461697 , 732-846-1697 7328461698 , 732-846-1698 7328461699 , 732-846-1699 7328461700 , 732-846-1700 7328461701 , 732-846-1701 7328461702 , 732-846-1702 7328461703 , 732-846-1703 7328461704 , 732-846-1704 7328461705 , 732-846-1705 7328461706 , 732-846-1706 7328461707 , 732-846-1707 7328461708 , 732-846-1708 7328461709 , 732-846-1709 7328461710 , 732-846-1710 7328461711 , 732-846-1711 7328461712 , 732-846-1712 7328461713 , 732-846-1713 7328461714 , 732-846-1714 7328461715 , 732-846-1715 7328461716 , 732-846-1716 7328461717 , 732-846-1717 7328461718 , 732-846-1718 7328461719 , 732-846-1719 7328461720 , 732-846-1720 7328461721 , 732-846-1721 7328461722 , 732-846-1722 7328461723 , 732-846-1723 7328461724 , 732-846-1724 7328461725 , 732-846-1725 7328461726 , 732-846-1726 7328461727 , 732-846-1727 7328461728 , 732-846-1728 7328461729 , 732-846-1729 7328461730 , 732-846-1730 7328461731 , 732-846-1731 7328461732 , 732-846-1732 7328461733 , 732-846-1733 7328461734 , 732-846-1734 7328461735 , 732-846-1735 7328461736 , 732-846-1736 7328461737 , 732-846-1737 7328461738 , 732-846-1738 7328461739 , 732-846-1739 7328461740 , 732-846-1740 7328461741 , 732-846-1741 7328461742 , 732-846-1742 7328461743 , 732-846-1743 7328461744 , 732-846-1744 7328461745 , 732-846-1745 7328461746 , 732-846-1746 7328461747 , 732-846-1747 7328461748 , 732-846-1748 7328461749 , 732-846-1749 7328461750 , 732-846-1750 7328461751 , 732-846-1751 7328461752 , 732-846-1752 7328461753 , 732-846-1753 7328461754 , 732-846-1754 7328461755 , 732-846-1755 7328461756 , 732-846-1756 7328461757 , 732-846-1757 7328461758 , 732-846-1758 7328461759 , 732-846-1759 7328461760 , 732-846-1760 7328461761 , 732-846-1761 7328461762 , 732-846-1762 7328461763 , 732-846-1763 7328461764 , 732-846-1764 7328461765 , 732-846-1765 7328461766 , 732-846-1766 7328461767 , 732-846-1767 7328461768 , 732-846-1768 7328461769 , 732-846-1769 7328461770 , 732-846-1770 7328461771 , 732-846-1771 7328461772 , 732-846-1772 7328461773 , 732-846-1773 7328461774 , 732-846-1774 7328461775 , 732-846-1775 7328461776 , 732-846-1776 7328461777 , 732-846-1777 7328461778 , 732-846-1778 7328461779 , 732-846-1779 7328461780 , 732-846-1780 7328461781 , 732-846-1781 7328461782 , 732-846-1782 7328461783 , 732-846-1783 7328461784 , 732-846-1784 7328461785 , 732-846-1785 7328461786 , 732-846-1786 7328461787 , 732-846-1787 7328461788 , 732-846-1788 7328461789 , 732-846-1789 7328461790 , 732-846-1790 7328461791 , 732-846-1791 7328461792 , 732-846-1792 7328461793 , 732-846-1793 7328461794 , 732-846-1794 7328461795 , 732-846-1795 7328461796 , 732-846-1796 7328461797 , 732-846-1797 7328461798 , 732-846-1798 7328461799 , 732-846-1799 7328461800 , 732-846-1800 7328461801 , 732-846-1801 7328461802 , 732-846-1802 7328461803 , 732-846-1803 7328461804 , 732-846-1804 7328461805 , 732-846-1805 7328461806 , 732-846-1806 7328461807 , 732-846-1807 7328461808 , 732-846-1808 7328461809 , 732-846-1809 7328461810 , 732-846-1810 7328461811 , 732-846-1811 7328461812 , 732-846-1812 7328461813 , 732-846-1813 7328461814 , 732-846-1814 7328461815 , 732-846-1815 7328461816 , 732-846-1816 7328461817 , 732-846-1817 7328461818 , 732-846-1818 7328461819 , 732-846-1819 7328461820 , 732-846-1820 7328461821 , 732-846-1821 7328461822 , 732-846-1822 7328461823 , 732-846-1823 7328461824 , 732-846-1824 7328461825 , 732-846-1825 7328461826 , 732-846-1826 7328461827 , 732-846-1827 7328461828 , 732-846-1828 7328461829 , 732-846-1829 7328461830 , 732-846-1830 7328461831 , 732-846-1831 7328461832 , 732-846-1832 7328461833 , 732-846-1833 7328461834 , 732-846-1834 7328461835 , 732-846-1835 7328461836 , 732-846-1836 7328461837 , 732-846-1837 7328461838 , 732-846-1838 7328461839 , 732-846-1839 7328461840 , 732-846-1840 7328461841 , 732-846-1841 7328461842 , 732-846-1842 7328461843 , 732-846-1843 7328461844 , 732-846-1844 7328461845 , 732-846-1845 7328461846 , 732-846-1846 7328461847 , 732-846-1847 7328461848 , 732-846-1848 7328461849 , 732-846-1849 7328461850 , 732-846-1850 7328461851 , 732-846-1851 7328461852 , 732-846-1852 7328461853 , 732-846-1853 7328461854 , 732-846-1854 7328461855 , 732-846-1855 7328461856 , 732-846-1856 7328461857 , 732-846-1857 7328461858 , 732-846-1858 7328461859 , 732-846-1859 7328461860 , 732-846-1860 7328461861 , 732-846-1861 7328461862 , 732-846-1862 7328461863 , 732-846-1863 7328461864 , 732-846-1864 7328461865 , 732-846-1865 7328461866 , 732-846-1866 7328461867 , 732-846-1867 7328461868 , 732-846-1868 7328461869 , 732-846-1869 7328461870 , 732-846-1870 7328461871 , 732-846-1871 7328461872 , 732-846-1872 7328461873 , 732-846-1873 7328461874 , 732-846-1874 7328461875 , 732-846-1875 7328461876 , 732-846-1876 7328461877 , 732-846-1877 7328461878 , 732-846-1878 7328461879 , 732-846-1879 7328461880 , 732-846-1880 7328461881 , 732-846-1881 7328461882 , 732-846-1882 7328461883 , 732-846-1883 7328461884 , 732-846-1884 7328461885 , 732-846-1885 7328461886 , 732-846-1886 7328461887 , 732-846-1887 7328461888 , 732-846-1888 7328461889 , 732-846-1889 7328461890 , 732-846-1890 7328461891 , 732-846-1891 7328461892 , 732-846-1892 7328461893 , 732-846-1893 7328461894 , 732-846-1894 7328461895 , 732-846-1895 7328461896 , 732-846-1896 7328461897 , 732-846-1897 7328461898 , 732-846-1898 7328461899 , 732-846-1899 7328461900 , 732-846-1900 7328461901 , 732-846-1901 7328461902 , 732-846-1902 7328461903 , 732-846-1903 7328461904 , 732-846-1904 7328461905 , 732-846-1905 7328461906 , 732-846-1906 7328461907 , 732-846-1907 7328461908 , 732-846-1908 7328461909 , 732-846-1909 7328461910 , 732-846-1910 7328461911 , 732-846-1911 7328461912 , 732-846-1912 7328461913 , 732-846-1913 7328461914 , 732-846-1914 7328461915 , 732-846-1915 7328461916 , 732-846-1916 7328461917 , 732-846-1917 7328461918 , 732-846-1918 7328461919 , 732-846-1919 7328461920 , 732-846-1920 7328461921 , 732-846-1921 7328461922 , 732-846-1922 7328461923 , 732-846-1923 7328461924 , 732-846-1924 7328461925 , 732-846-1925 7328461926 , 732-846-1926 7328461927 , 732-846-1927 7328461928 , 732-846-1928 7328461929 , 732-846-1929 7328461930 , 732-846-1930 7328461931 , 732-846-1931 7328461932 , 732-846-1932 7328461933 , 732-846-1933 7328461934 , 732-846-1934 7328461935 , 732-846-1935 7328461936 , 732-846-1936 7328461937 , 732-846-1937 7328461938 , 732-846-1938 7328461939 , 732-846-1939 7328461940 , 732-846-1940 7328461941 , 732-846-1941 7328461942 , 732-846-1942 7328461943 , 732-846-1943 7328461944 , 732-846-1944 7328461945 , 732-846-1945 7328461946 , 732-846-1946 7328461947 , 732-846-1947 7328461948 , 732-846-1948 7328461949 , 732-846-1949 7328461950 , 732-846-1950 7328461951 , 732-846-1951 7328461952 , 732-846-1952 7328461953 , 732-846-1953 7328461954 , 732-846-1954 7328461955 , 732-846-1955 7328461956 , 732-846-1956 7328461957 , 732-846-1957 7328461958 , 732-846-1958 7328461959 , 732-846-1959 7328461960 , 732-846-1960 7328461961 , 732-846-1961 7328461962 , 732-846-1962 7328461963 , 732-846-1963 7328461964 , 732-846-1964 7328461965 , 732-846-1965 7328461966 , 732-846-1966 7328461967 , 732-846-1967 7328461968 , 732-846-1968 7328461969 , 732-846-1969 7328461970 , 732-846-1970 7328461971 , 732-846-1971 7328461972 , 732-846-1972 7328461973 , 732-846-1973 7328461974 , 732-846-1974 7328461975 , 732-846-1975 7328461976 , 732-846-1976 7328461977 , 732-846-1977 7328461978 , 732-846-1978 7328461979 , 732-846-1979 7328461980 , 732-846-1980 7328461981 , 732-846-1981 7328461982 , 732-846-1982 7328461983 , 732-846-1983 7328461984 , 732-846-1984 7328461985 , 732-846-1985 7328461986 , 732-846-1986 7328461987 , 732-846-1987 7328461988 , 732-846-1988 7328461989 , 732-846-1989 7328461990 , 732-846-1990 7328461991 , 732-846-1991 7328461992 , 732-846-1992 7328461993 , 732-846-1993 7328461994 , 732-846-1994 7328461995 , 732-846-1995 7328461996 , 732-846-1996 7328461997 , 732-846-1997 7328461998 , 732-846-1998 7328461999 , 732-846-1999 7328462000 , 732-846-2000 7328462001 , 732-846-2001 7328462002 , 732-846-2002 7328462003 , 732-846-2003 7328462004 , 732-846-2004 7328462005 , 732-846-2005 7328462006 , 732-846-2006 7328462007 , 732-846-2007 7328462008 , 732-846-2008 7328462009 , 732-846-2009 7328462010 , 732-846-2010 7328462011 , 732-846-2011 7328462012 , 732-846-2012 7328462013 , 732-846-2013 7328462014 , 732-846-2014 7328462015 , 732-846-2015 7328462016 , 732-846-2016 7328462017 , 732-846-2017 7328462018 , 732-846-2018 7328462019 , 732-846-2019 7328462020 , 732-846-2020 7328462021 , 732-846-2021 7328462022 , 732-846-2022 7328462023 , 732-846-2023 7328462024 , 732-846-2024 7328462025 , 732-846-2025 7328462026 , 732-846-2026 7328462027 , 732-846-2027 7328462028 , 732-846-2028 7328462029 , 732-846-2029 7328462030 , 732-846-2030 7328462031 , 732-846-2031 7328462032 , 732-846-2032 7328462033 , 732-846-2033 7328462034 , 732-846-2034 7328462035 , 732-846-2035 7328462036 , 732-846-2036 7328462037 , 732-846-2037 7328462038 , 732-846-2038 7328462039 , 732-846-2039 7328462040 , 732-846-2040 7328462041 , 732-846-2041 7328462042 , 732-846-2042 7328462043 , 732-846-2043 7328462044 , 732-846-2044 7328462045 , 732-846-2045 7328462046 , 732-846-2046 7328462047 , 732-846-2047 7328462048 , 732-846-2048 7328462049 , 732-846-2049 7328462050 , 732-846-2050 7328462051 , 732-846-2051 7328462052 , 732-846-2052 7328462053 , 732-846-2053 7328462054 , 732-846-2054 7328462055 , 732-846-2055 7328462056 , 732-846-2056 7328462057 , 732-846-2057 7328462058 , 732-846-2058 7328462059 , 732-846-2059 7328462060 , 732-846-2060 7328462061 , 732-846-2061 7328462062 , 732-846-2062 7328462063 , 732-846-2063 7328462064 , 732-846-2064 7328462065 , 732-846-2065 7328462066 , 732-846-2066 7328462067 , 732-846-2067 7328462068 , 732-846-2068 7328462069 , 732-846-2069 7328462070 , 732-846-2070 7328462071 , 732-846-2071 7328462072 , 732-846-2072 7328462073 , 732-846-2073 7328462074 , 732-846-2074 7328462075 , 732-846-2075 7328462076 , 732-846-2076 7328462077 , 732-846-2077 7328462078 , 732-846-2078 7328462079 , 732-846-2079 7328462080 , 732-846-2080 7328462081 , 732-846-2081 7328462082 , 732-846-2082 7328462083 , 732-846-2083 7328462084 , 732-846-2084 7328462085 , 732-846-2085 7328462086 , 732-846-2086 7328462087 , 732-846-2087 7328462088 , 732-846-2088 7328462089 , 732-846-2089 7328462090 , 732-846-2090 7328462091 , 732-846-2091 7328462092 , 732-846-2092 7328462093 , 732-846-2093 7328462094 , 732-846-2094 7328462095 , 732-846-2095 7328462096 , 732-846-2096 7328462097 , 732-846-2097 7328462098 , 732-846-2098 7328462099 , 732-846-2099 7328462100 , 732-846-2100 7328462101 , 732-846-2101 7328462102 , 732-846-2102 7328462103 , 732-846-2103 7328462104 , 732-846-2104 7328462105 , 732-846-2105 7328462106 , 732-846-2106 7328462107 , 732-846-2107 7328462108 , 732-846-2108 7328462109 , 732-846-2109 7328462110 , 732-846-2110 7328462111 , 732-846-2111 7328462112 , 732-846-2112 7328462113 , 732-846-2113 7328462114 , 732-846-2114 7328462115 , 732-846-2115 7328462116 , 732-846-2116 7328462117 , 732-846-2117 7328462118 , 732-846-2118 7328462119 , 732-846-2119 7328462120 , 732-846-2120 7328462121 , 732-846-2121 7328462122 , 732-846-2122 7328462123 , 732-846-2123 7328462124 , 732-846-2124 7328462125 , 732-846-2125 7328462126 , 732-846-2126 7328462127 , 732-846-2127 7328462128 , 732-846-2128 7328462129 , 732-846-2129 7328462130 , 732-846-2130 7328462131 , 732-846-2131 7328462132 , 732-846-2132 7328462133 , 732-846-2133 7328462134 , 732-846-2134 7328462135 , 732-846-2135 7328462136 , 732-846-2136 7328462137 , 732-846-2137 7328462138 , 732-846-2138 7328462139 , 732-846-2139 7328462140 , 732-846-2140 7328462141 , 732-846-2141 7328462142 , 732-846-2142 7328462143 , 732-846-2143 7328462144 , 732-846-2144 7328462145 , 732-846-2145 7328462146 , 732-846-2146 7328462147 , 732-846-2147 7328462148 , 732-846-2148 7328462149 , 732-846-2149 7328462150 , 732-846-2150 7328462151 , 732-846-2151 7328462152 , 732-846-2152 7328462153 , 732-846-2153 7328462154 , 732-846-2154 7328462155 , 732-846-2155 7328462156 , 732-846-2156 7328462157 , 732-846-2157 7328462158 , 732-846-2158 7328462159 , 732-846-2159 7328462160 , 732-846-2160 7328462161 , 732-846-2161 7328462162 , 732-846-2162 7328462163 , 732-846-2163 7328462164 , 732-846-2164 7328462165 , 732-846-2165 7328462166 , 732-846-2166 7328462167 , 732-846-2167 7328462168 , 732-846-2168 7328462169 , 732-846-2169 7328462170 , 732-846-2170 7328462171 , 732-846-2171 7328462172 , 732-846-2172 7328462173 , 732-846-2173 7328462174 , 732-846-2174 7328462175 , 732-846-2175 7328462176 , 732-846-2176 7328462177 , 732-846-2177 7328462178 , 732-846-2178 7328462179 , 732-846-2179 7328462180 , 732-846-2180 7328462181 , 732-846-2181 7328462182 , 732-846-2182 7328462183 , 732-846-2183 7328462184 , 732-846-2184 7328462185 , 732-846-2185 7328462186 , 732-846-2186 7328462187 , 732-846-2187 7328462188 , 732-846-2188 7328462189 , 732-846-2189 7328462190 , 732-846-2190 7328462191 , 732-846-2191 7328462192 , 732-846-2192 7328462193 , 732-846-2193 7328462194 , 732-846-2194 7328462195 , 732-846-2195 7328462196 , 732-846-2196 7328462197 , 732-846-2197 7328462198 , 732-846-2198 7328462199 , 732-846-2199 7328462200 , 732-846-2200 7328462201 , 732-846-2201 7328462202 , 732-846-2202 7328462203 , 732-846-2203 7328462204 , 732-846-2204 7328462205 , 732-846-2205 7328462206 , 732-846-2206 7328462207 , 732-846-2207 7328462208 , 732-846-2208 7328462209 , 732-846-2209 7328462210 , 732-846-2210 7328462211 , 732-846-2211 7328462212 , 732-846-2212 7328462213 , 732-846-2213 7328462214 , 732-846-2214 7328462215 , 732-846-2215 7328462216 , 732-846-2216 7328462217 , 732-846-2217 7328462218 , 732-846-2218 7328462219 , 732-846-2219 7328462220 , 732-846-2220 7328462221 , 732-846-2221 7328462222 , 732-846-2222 7328462223 , 732-846-2223 7328462224 , 732-846-2224 7328462225 , 732-846-2225 7328462226 , 732-846-2226 7328462227 , 732-846-2227 7328462228 , 732-846-2228 7328462229 , 732-846-2229 7328462230 , 732-846-2230 7328462231 , 732-846-2231 7328462232 , 732-846-2232 7328462233 , 732-846-2233 7328462234 , 732-846-2234 7328462235 , 732-846-2235 7328462236 , 732-846-2236 7328462237 , 732-846-2237 7328462238 , 732-846-2238 7328462239 , 732-846-2239 7328462240 , 732-846-2240 7328462241 , 732-846-2241 7328462242 , 732-846-2242 7328462243 , 732-846-2243 7328462244 , 732-846-2244 7328462245 , 732-846-2245 7328462246 , 732-846-2246 7328462247 , 732-846-2247 7328462248 , 732-846-2248 7328462249 , 732-846-2249 7328462250 , 732-846-2250